A plaque remaining from the Big Apple Night Club at West 135th Street and Seventh Avenue in Harlem.

Above, a 1934 plaque from the Big Apple Night Club at West 135th Street and Seventh Avenue in Harlem. Discarded as trash in 2006.

Recent entries:
“Smoked salmon should be sliced so thin, you can read the New York Times through it” (5/27)
“Exercise? I thought you said extra fries” (5/27)
“This wine pairs well with turkey and difficult relatives” (5/27)
“No one in my entire life has believed in me more than the waiter who just gave me a single napkin” (5/27)
“Every loaf of bread is a tragic story of grains that could have become beer, but didn’t” (5/27)
More new entries...

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The Big Apple. An etymological dictionary (over 11,000 entries) investigating the origins of American words, names, quotations and phrases, specializing in modern slang, neologisms, nicknames, slogans, proverbs, adages, idioms and aphorisms. There are regional dictionaries of New York City, Florida, Oregon and Texas. A website by Barry Popik.


Above, the header from the 1924 newspaper column of John J. Fitz Gerald. Click to see a portion of the column which includes his use of "Big Apple." Part of a 1926 column is also available.


Above, a cartoon representing the idea of the "big apple" from the 1920s. Click to see the full version.

SUMMARY: "Why is New York called the Big Apple?"