A plaque remaining from the Big Apple Night Club at West 135th Street and Seventh Avenue in Harlem.

Above, a 1934 plaque from the Big Apple Night Club at West 135th Street and Seventh Avenue in Harlem. Discarded as trash in 2006.

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Entry from August 18, 2005
9-11 (One Day’s Pay: National Day of Voluntary Service, Charity, Compassion)
9-11-2001 was a national tragedy. Several events are held on the anniversary of that day. One Day's Pay has organized a National Day of Voluntary Service, Charity and Compassion.

http://www.onedayspay.org/index.php
We're the national nonprofit working to establish 9/11 as a National Day of Voluntary Service, Charity and Compassion. This 9/11, take time out of your day to help a friend in need, give blood, donate to a charity, volunteer your time, or just be kind to others. That's all you need to do to participate. See below for suggestions and resources. Thanks.

One Day's Pay Kicks Off $500,000 Campaign to Promote NYC Remembers 9/11 Observance. Read More.

Actor Gary Sinise Helps One Day's Pay Produce Its First Ever TV and Radio PSA advertisements. Download PSA's.

http://www.onedayspay.org/about/faq.php
About Us // FAQ

What is One Day's Pay?
One Day's Pay is a nonprofit 501c3 organization leading the effort to establish September 11 as a national day of voluntary service, charity and compassion. Our mission is simple: to encourage people everywhere to set aside time every September 11 to help others in need. In this way, we hope to keep alive forever, in our memories and actions, the spirit of giving and selfless service that unified our nation following the terrorist attacks.

How do I participate?
If you'd like to join the effort, it's easy. If you live outside NYC, simply visit the One Day's Pay Web site (http://www.onedayspay.org) and register your good-faith, non-binding and confidential pledge to devote a portion of your day on September 11 to serving others in any fashion you deem appropriate. And you don't need to decide right now what to do to register a pledge. Check out our ideas for further guidance or to find opportunities in your community.

What if I cannot do something that day? Can I do something another day?
Absolutely. The spirit of One Day's Pay is for you to commit to doing something good for someone else. So if you are busy on September 11, simply make a plan on that day to do something at another time that's more convenient. We are encouraging as many activities during the week of September 11. For instance, you could contact your local volunteer center (http://www.1800volunteer.org) and offer to help later in the week, or the following week. Or you could simply make an appointment for later with the Red Cross or local Blood Center to give blood.

If I plan to do something on my own, why do I still need to register pledge to participate in One Day's Pay?
You don't need to register a pledge. Your pledge simply helps us know how many people are participating and what people are thinking of doing. We publish the growing number of One Day's Pay pledges to illustrate public support for establishing September 11 as a National Day of Voluntary Service, Charity and Compassion.

Do people who pledge to participate have to select from certain charities or volunteer opportunities available through One Day's Pay?
Nope. People can decide for themselves what they want to do and make their own arrangements. However, the One Day's Pay include many resources and some toolkits to help individuals and organizations plan their own activities.

Are people required to donate money or volunteer?
People define for themselves the meaning of service to others. The principle is to help others in need and however you decide to do that is up to you. You can donate money, volunteer time, assist someone crossing the street, buy groceries for an elderly neighbor who is homebound, donate clothing, make an appointment to give blood, or engage in some other activity that benefits to another person. There are literally thousands of things you can do. It's all about recreating the spirit of unity and compassion we shared after 9/11.

Do people need to know what they intend to do on September 11 to register a pledge?
No. A pledge is merely a good-faith statement of intention to engage in a service activity on or around September 11. You need not include a description of your plans if you do not know them.

Are you suggesting that companies close on that day?
No. Companies do not need to close at all. There are many things they can do without closing, such as running a clothing, canned food, or toy drive, or allowing employees, on a one-time basis, a little extra paid or unpaid time off for community service activities, just as many companies allow people time to vote or participate in jury duty. Many companies are simply integrating this observance with existing plans for volunteerism.

Why was One Day's Pay formed?
One Day's Pay was originally formed shortly after the terrorist attacks by a group that included relatives of 9/11 victims, business leaders and others who felt compelled to find a lasting way to pay tribute to victims and heroes of 9/11. Today, One Day's Pay has become an international initiative honoring not only those affected by 9/11, but also others throughout the world who are victims of terrorism.

Who is behind One Day's Pay?
A consortium of relatives of 9/11 victims, leading nonprofit organizations and business and community leaders make up the Board of Directors and National Advisory Board of One Day's Pay. See

Posted by Barry Popik
Holidays/Events/Parades • (0) Comments • Thursday, August 18, 2005 • Permalink