A plaque remaining from the Big Apple Night Club at West 135th Street and Seventh Avenue in Harlem.

Above, a 1934 plaque from the Big Apple Night Club at West 135th Street and Seventh Avenue in Harlem. Discarded as trash in 2006.

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Entry from September 12, 2012
“A hangover is the wrath of grapes”

"The grapes of wrath” is a lyric in “The Battle Hymn of the Republic,” a hymn by Julia Ward Howe written in 1861. The Grapes of Wrath is also the title of a 1939 novel by John Steinbeck.

“A champagne hangover, according to Jackie Kelk of NBC-TV’s Aldrich Family Show, is defined as the wrath of grapes” was cited in print in May 1951. A hangover is still often described as “the wrath of grapes.”


Wikipedia: Battle Hymn of the Republic
“The Battle Hymn of the Republic” is a hymn by American writer Julia Ward Howe using the music from the song “John Brown’s Body”. Howe’s more famous lyrics were written in November 1861 and first published in in February 1862. The song links the judgment of the wicked at the end of time (New Testament) with the American Civil War. Since that time it has become an extremely popular and well-known American patriotic song.
(...)
Lyrics
Mine eyes have seen the glory of the coming of the Lord:
He is trampling out the vintage where the grapes of wrath are stored;
He hath loosed the fateful lightning of His terrible swift sword:
His truth is marching on.

29 May 1951, The Times-Picayune (New Orleans, LA), “The Column on the Square” by Ed Brooks, pg. 35, col. 3:
A champagne hangover, according to Jackie Kelk of NBC-TV’s Aldrich Family Show, is defined as the wrath of grapes.

Google News Archive
12 July 1951, The Telegraph-Herald (Dubuque, IA), pg. 2, col. 1 ad:
We suppose a champagne hangover could be called the wrath of grapes.
-- Col. Starbottle
(Star Beer—ed.)

7 January 1952, The Times-Picayune (New Orleans, LA), “The Column on the Square” by Ed Brooks, pg. 21, col. 3:
Now that Carnival balls are seasonal, we should remind you that a champagne hangover is sometimes defined as the wrath of grapes.

9 June 1963, Chicago (IL) Tribune, pg. H42:
“A champagne hangover,” says Paul Fogarty, “may be defined as the wrath of grapes.”

16 December 1963, San Antonio (TX) Light, “A Laugh-Handed Book” by Jim Bishop, pg. 23, col. 2:
BRANDY HANGOVER. The wrath of grapes.
(The Left-handed Dictionary by Leonard Louis Levinson—ed.)

OCLC WorldCat record
The wrath of grapes or the hangover companion
Author: Andy Toper
Publisher: London : Souvenir Press, ©1996.
Edition/Format: Book : English

OCLC WorldCat record
The wrath of grapes : a complete hangover cookbook & guide to the art of creative suffering
Author: Patrick Meanor
Publisher: Gambier, Ohio : Xoxox Press, ©2004.
Edition/Format: Book : English

US Beverages
Thursday, November 11, 2010
“A hangover is the wrath of grapes” - Quotes about Drinking

Posted by Barry Popik
New York CityFood/Drink • (1) Comments • Wednesday, September 12, 2012 • Permalink


Good enough, well constructed and very interesting.  I have bookmarked you hopefully you keep posting new stuff.  Many thanks.

Posted by boxes for moving gold coast  on  09/25  at  09:02 AM

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