A plaque remaining from the Big Apple Night Club at West 135th Street and Seventh Avenue in Harlem.

Above, a 1934 plaque from the Big Apple Night Club at West 135th Street and Seventh Avenue in Harlem. Discarded as trash in 2006.

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Entry from October 14, 2015
Binghamton: Parlor City (nickname)

Binghamton, the county seat of Broome County, New York, has had the nickname “Parlor City” since at least December 1873. As explained in a newspaper in September 1875:

“The readers of the New York Daily Graphic will remember the fine pictures of the locality of which I write in the Binghamton supplement in the spring, and will believe me when I tell of the Parlor city, as this one is called. It is so called because it resembles a handsome parlor carpeted with green velvet, its walls covered with the most magnificent landscapes by the Great Artist.”

Another Binghamton nickname is “Carousel Capital of the World.”


Wikipedia: Binghamton, New York
Binghamton /ˈbɪŋəmtən/ is a city in, and the county seat of, Broome County, New York, United States. It lies in the state’s Southern Tier region near the Pennsylvania border, in a bowl-shaped valley at the confluence of the Susquehanna and Chenango Rivers. Binghamton is the principal city and cultural center of the Binghamton metropolitan area (also known as Greater Binghamton, or historically the Triple Cities), home to a quarter million people. The population of the city itself, according to the 2010 census, is 47,376.
(...)
Nickname(s): The Parlor City, Carousel Capital of the World, Valley of Opportunity

Old Fulton NY Post Cards
10 December 1873, Broome Republican (Binghamton, NY), “City Market,” pg. 8, col. 5:
Those industries, from the bay and beer wagons to the peanut roasters, are all right, and go to make up the substance and contribute to the happiness of life, but when they come in such numbers as to block up the streets and interfere with travel, it is evident the Parlor city should have a kitchen, and that the time has come to provide for one.

Old Fulton NY Post Cards
6 February 1874, Waverly (NY) Advocate, pg. 3, col. 1:
We take but one of the best Binghamton daily papers—the Times—but if the others are any where near a match for that they have got a pretty lively set of dailies in the “Parlor City.”

NYS Historic Newspapers
6 August 1874, Mexico Independent and Deaf-Mutes’ Journal (Mexico, NY), pg. 2(?), col. 3:
Letter from Binghamton.
BINGHAMTON, Aug. 3, 1874.
EDITOR INDEPENDENT:—Have you ever visited Binghamton? Then you have seen what people here delight to call the “Parlor City.” You have seen a city surrounded by the most beautiful natural scenery, with hills and valleys, and rivers (for there are two), and, above all, you have undoubtedly seen the Inebriate Asylum.

24 November 1874, Daily Gazette and Bulletin (Williamsport, PA), pg. 1, col. 1:
The advantages to be derived from the construction of the railroad, which will, at no distant day, unite Williamsport with the Parlor City (Binghamton—ed.), are pointed out.

16 May 1875, Cincinnati (OH) Enquirer, pg. 1, col. 5:
BINGHAMTON.
Where People Go When Their “Sprees Begin to Run Into Each Other”—How Drunkards Are Reformed.
Special Correspondence of the Enquirer.
BINGHAMTON, NEW YORK, May 7, 1875.
Binghamton, one of the prettiest little cities it has ever been my good fortune to see, is located at the confluence of the beautiful Susquehanna and Chenango Rivers. It lies in a lovely valley, and is almost entirely surrounded by a range of hills that very nearly approach the dignity of mountains. The city has 15,000 or 18,00 people, and by its wide, well-kept streets, handsome public edifices, and tasty private residences has well earned and well deserves the sobriquet of “The Parlor City.”

Old Fulton NY Post Cards
2 June 1875, Broome Republican (Binghamton, NY), “County Correspondence—Port Crane,” pg. 1, col. 1:
Mr. Fred Sterling moved to Binghamton last week. We are sorry to lose a good citizen, but we know that our loss is the “Parlor City’s” gain.

5 September 1875,The Capital (Washington, DC), “Letter from Miss Grundy,” pg. 7, col. 1:
The readers of the New York Daily Graphic will remember the fine pictures of the locality of which I write in the Binghamton supplement in the spring, and will believe me when I tell of the Parlor city, as this one is called. It is so called because it resembles a handsome parlor carpeted with green velvet, its walls covered with the most magnificent landscapes by the Great Artist.

2 August 1876, The Daily Graphic (New York, NY), pg. 3, col. 3:
THE PARLOR CITY.
THE NATURAL BEAUTIES AND VARIOUS IMPROVEMENTS OF BINGHAMTON—GOSSIP CONCERNING THE ASYLUM AND OTHER INSTITUTIONS—SOME DISTINGUISHED RESIDENTS.

Chronicling America
5 August 1880, Mower County Transcript (Austin, MN), pg. 1, cols. 6-7:
A Beautiful New York City.
Binghamton, N. Y., known as “The Parlor City,” claims to be the cleanest town in America. Each residence has its own lawn and ornamental flower beds. There are no fences between these homes or on the streets, so that the eye roves over an unbroken line of smooth-shaven grass and carefully-tended flower beds, these extending from one square to another. Between the sidewalks and the trees there is a narrow strip of grass, which is kept as neatly and well-rolled as the plots next the houses. Outside are the rows of trees, and in many streets there is a double row, one inside, and the other outside of the sidewalk.

OCLC WorldCat record
Resources and industries of Binghamton, N.Y. : a résumé of the commercial and manufacturing progress of the Parlor City, together with a condensed summary of its material development and history, its advantages of location, plan of city government, its churches and schools, literary and social life, its railroad connections and its public conveniences, its industries and general features of attraction to capitalists and manufacturers : illustrated
Author: C H Possons; Binghamton Board of Trade.
Publisher: [Glens Falls, N.Y.] : [C.H. Possons], 1888.
Series: Genealogy & local history, LH3194.
Edition/Format: Book Microform : Microfiche : Master microform : English

OCLC WorldCat record
Parlor City march : two step
Author: G M Roth
Publisher: Binghamton, N.Y. : G.M. Roth, ©1899.
Edition/Format: Musical score : No Linguistic Content

OCLC WorldCat record
Binghamton, the parlor city.
Publisher: Binghamton, N.Y. : C.S. Woolworth & Co., ©1906.
Edition/Format: Print book : English

OCLC WorldCat record
Binghamton : building the Parlor City
Author: Brian Frey; Bill Gorman; Greg Keeler; WSKG TV (Television station : Binghamton, N.Y.); WSKG Public Telecommunications Council.
Publisher: Binghamton, NY : WSKG Public Telecommunications Council, 2003. ©2003.
Edition/Format: DVD video : English
Database: WorldCat
Summary:
“In 1786, William Bingham, a wealthy banker and land speculator from Philadelphia, purchased 10,000 acres of land in Upstate New York. Bingham had a vision of building a model village that would rival any in New England. Bingham would never live to see the city that would bear his name, but by the end of the 19th century, Binghamton would become one of the industrial centers of the Northeast. Binghamton: building the parlor city chronicles the history of Binghamton and its rise from an Indian village through its industrial heyday"--Container.

Posted by Barry Popik
Nicknames of Other PlacesNew York State • Wednesday, October 14, 2015 • Permalink