A plaque remaining from the Big Apple Night Club at West 135th Street and Seventh Avenue in Harlem.

Above, a 1934 plaque from the Big Apple Night Club at West 135th Street and Seventh Avenue in Harlem. Discarded as trash in 2006.

Recent entries:
“Why can’t someone look at me the same way I look at pizza?” (4/27)
“What’s the best place to buy Cheerios and donuts?"/"Hole Foods.” (4/26)
“Warning! The consumption of alcohol might cause you to think you can sing” (4/26)
“Life is basically all the stuff you have to do to get from coffee to wine time” (4/25)
“I respect faith, but doubt is what gets you an education” (4/25)
More new entries...

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Entry from January 20, 2005
Bloody Angle (Doyers Street)
Doyers Street (in Chinatown) was called "the Bloody Angle" around 1900 because of murders that occurred on the street. The term has long fadded into history, but the angle of Doyers Street is still there.

25 December 1910, New York Times, pg. 10:
Kelly, proprietor of the Mandarin Cafe at Chinatown's Bloody Angle, as the junction of Doyers and Mott Streets is called.

25 March 1927, New York Times, pg. 1:
On the "bloody angle" at Doyers and Pell Streets a single uniformed policeman remained alone most of the day.

15 December 1946, New York Times, pg. SM13:
A TUMBLE of strange herbs in shop windows, a suspicion of opium dens, a tour guide's lurid commentary on the tong wars, the Bloody Angle of Doyers Street, where, thirty-five years ago, fifty Chinese were murdered in a spurt of Oriental mayhem - all this adds to the myth of mystery and suppressed violence.
Posted by Barry Popik
Streets • (0) Comments • Thursday, January 20, 2005 • Permalink