A plaque remaining from the Big Apple Night Club at West 135th Street and Seventh Avenue in Harlem.

Above, a 1934 plaque from the Big Apple Night Club at West 135th Street and Seventh Avenue in Harlem. Discarded as trash in 2006.

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Entry from March 21, 2014
Brain Freeze

Entry in progress—B.P.

Wikipedia: Ice-cream headache
An ice-cream headache, also known as brain freeze, cold-stimulus headache, or its given scientific name sphenopalatine ganglioneuralgia (meaning “nerve pain of the sphenopalatine ganglion“-and is also considered a misnomer since the pain nerves have nothing to do with the sphenopalatine/pterygopalatine ganglion, but travel along the trigeminal nerves described below), is a form of brief cranial pain or headache commonly associated with consumption (particularly quick consumption) of cold beverages or foods such as ice cream and ice pops. It is caused by having something cold touch the roof of the mouth (palate), and is believed to result from a nerve response causing rapid constriction and swelling of blood vessels or a “referring” of pain from the roof of the mouth to the head. The rate of intake for cold foods has been studied as a contributing factor.

The term ice-cream headache has been in use since at least 31 January 1937, contained in a journal entry by Rebecca Timbres published in the 1939 book We didn’t ask Utopia: a Quaker family in Soviet Russia. The first published use of the term brain freeze, as it pertains to cold-induced headaches, was on 27 May 1991.

OCLC WorldCat record
Brain freeze & other stories : short fiction
Author: Jodi Bloom
Publisher: Reston, VA : Ancient Mariners Press, ©1996.
Edition/Format: Book : Poetry : English

Twitter
Darrin M. Easley
‏@DarrinMEasley
In 1994, 7-Eleven coined the term “brain freeze.” The word was developed to explain the feeling people get when drinking a Slurpee.
2:40 AM - 21 Mar 2014

(Trademark)
Word Mark BRAINFREEZE
Goods and Services IC 032. US 045 046 048. G & S: semi-frozen soft drinks. FIRST USE: 19931001. FIRST USE IN COMMERCE: 19931001
Mark Drawing Code (1) TYPED DRAWING
Serial Number 74586922
Filing Date October 18, 1994
Current Basis 1A
Original Filing Basis 1B
Published for Opposition September 26, 1995
Registration Number 2012487
Registration Date October 29, 1996
Owner (REGISTRANT) Southland Corporation, The CORPORATION TEXAS 2711 North Haskell Avenue Dallas TEXAS 75204
(LAST LISTED OWNER) 7-ELEVEN, INC. CORPORATION BY CHANGE OF NAME TEXAS 2711 NORTH HASKELL AVENUE DALLAS TEXAS 75204
Assignment Recorded ASSIGNMENT RECORDED
Attorney of Record Diane G. Elder
Type of Mark TRADEMARK
Register PRINCIPAL
Affidavit Text SECT 15. SECT 8 (6-YR). SECTION 8(10-YR) 20070524.
Renewal 1ST RENEWAL 20070524
Live/Dead Indicator LIVE

Posted by Barry Popik
New York CityFood/Drink • Friday, March 21, 2014 • Permalink