A plaque remaining from the Big Apple Night Club at West 135th Street and Seventh Avenue in Harlem.

Above, a 1934 plaque from the Big Apple Night Club at West 135th Street and Seventh Avenue in Harlem. Discarded as trash in 2006.

Recent entries:
“Roses are red, violets are blue-ish. If it weren’t for Christmas, we’d all be Jewish” (1/20)
“When has a man a right to scold his wife about his coffee?"/"When he has sufficient grounds.” (1/20)
“When does a lawyer make coffee?"/"When he has sufficient grounds.” (1/19)
“Accordion to research, most people will not notice musical instruments appearing within sentences” (1/19)
“Yttrium barium copper oxide walks into a bar…” (bar joke) (1/19)
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Entry from July 19, 2004
Bridge and Tunnel People
The "bridge-and-tunnel people" or "bridge-and-tunnel crowd" is a holdover term from the Studio 54-era of the 1970s.

It's usually a disparaging term, but why look down on people who want to come here?


13 December 1977, New York Times, Pg. 83:
"On the weekends, we get all the bridge and tunnel people who try to get in," he said.

Elizabeth Fondaras, a pillar of the city's conservative social scene, who has just told Mr. Rubell she had never tried to get into Studio 54 for fear of being rejected, asked who the bridge and tunnel people were.

"Those people from Queens and Staten Island and those places," he said.


22 April 1981, New York Times, pg. C1:
"One Saturday night we had 36 no-shows. It's because then you get the sort of people who don't go regularly to restaurants and don't know--the bridge and tunnel crowd."
Posted by Barry Popik
Workers/People • (0) Comments • Monday, July 19, 2004 • Permalink