A plaque remaining from the Big Apple Night Club at West 135th Street and Seventh Avenue in Harlem.

Above, a 1934 plaque from the Big Apple Night Club at West 135th Street and Seventh Avenue in Harlem. Discarded as trash in 2006.

Recent entries:
Dumbocracy (dumb + democracy) (4/19)
“Meat so tender, you can leave your teeth at home” (Pit Stop BBQ, Waxahachie) (4/19)
Jewluminati or Jewlluminati or Jooluminati (Jew + Illuminati) (4/19)
Bureaustan (bureau + -stan) (4/18)
“Price action makes market commentary” (4/18)
More new entries...

A  B  C  D  E  F  G  H  I  J  K  L  M  N  O  P  Q  R  S  T  U  V  W  X  Y  Z


Entry from October 31, 2005
Buttermilk Channel
The "Buttermilk Channel" is an old term for the separation between Governors Island and Brooklyn.

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Buttermilk_Channel
The Buttermilk Channel is a small tidal strait, approximately one mile long and one-fourth of a mile wide, separating Governors Island from Brooklyn in Upper New York Bay. At one time this channel could be crossed at low tide, and farmers would bring their cows over to Governor's Island for grazing.

Historically it has been a busy shipping lane and the most convenient access to the Brooklyn waterfront.

February-April 1806, The Medical Repository, pg. 433:
The passage between Governor's-Island and Long-Island, formerly called Butter-milk channel, and within the memory of man, both narrow and shallow, is now eight fathoms deep.

September 1815, The American Magazine, Pg. 173:
She lost one of her wheels and anchors, and was driven into the bay below Governor's Island, in danger of foundering. At day-light, however, she contrived to beat into Buttermilk Channel, and fortunately got into Whitehall.

Posted by Barry Popik
Transportation • (0) Comments • Monday, October 31, 2005 • Permalink