A plaque remaining from the Big Apple Night Club at West 135th Street and Seventh Avenue in Harlem.

Above, a 1934 plaque from the Big Apple Night Club at West 135th Street and Seventh Avenue in Harlem. Discarded as trash in 2006.

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Entry from April 07, 2013
Chelsean (inhabitant of Chelsea, Manhattan)

"Chelsean” is the name of an inhabitant of Chelsea, in the borough of Manhattan. The name “Chelsean” has been cited in print since at least 1939, when a neighborhood newspaper titled The Chelsean was published.

An inhabitant of Chelsea has also been called a “Chelseaite” (cited in print since at least 1935).


Wikipedia: Chelsea, Manhattan
Chelsea is a neighborhood on the West Side of the borough of Manhattan in New York City. The district’s boundaries are roughly 14th Street to the south, 30th Street to the north, the western boundary of the Ladies’ Mile Historic District – which lies between the Avenue of the Americas (Sixth Avenue) and Seventh Avenue – to the east, and the Hudson River and West Street to the west. To the north of Chelsea is the neighborhood of Hell’s Kitchen, also known as “Clinton,” to the northeast is the Garment District, to the east are NoMad and the Flatiron District, to the southwest is the Meatpacking District and to the southeast is the West Village.
(...)
The neighborhood is primarily residential, with a mix of tenements, apartment blocks, city housing projects, townhouses and renovated rowhouses, and its many retail businesses reflect the ethnic and social diversity of the population. The western part of Chelsea has become a center of the New York art world, with many art galleries located in both new buildings and rehabilitated warehouses.

OCLC WorldCat record
The Chelsean
Publisher: [New York, N.Y : s.n.]
Edition/Format: Newspaper : Microfilm : Master microform : English
Notes:
“Published every Friday ‘Of, By and For the People of Chelsea’.”
“Founded in 1939 by Mrs. Walter Nelson Sedgwick.”

Google Books
18 September 1964, Life magazine, “The madcap Chelsea, New York’s most illustrious third-rate hotel” by Marshall Smith, pg. 137, col. 1:
Early Chelseans were inclined to be highly placed in the social and business worlds, although there were a few distinguished artists, actors and actresses who stayed at the hotel.

18 August 1975, New York (NY) Times, “Charming Chelsea: A Multifaceted Neighborhood That Cares” by Angela Taylor, pg. 30:
Chelseans agree that the mixture makes the neighborhood safer.

New York (NY) Times
IF YOU’RE THINKING OF LIVING IN: CHELSEA
By LESLIE BENNETTS
Published: May 2, 1982
(...)
Hilda Regier, a Chelsean for 14 years, said she can walk down the street on a Saturday afternoon and greet every third or fourth person she meets by name.

Google Books
Let Them Call Me Rebel:
Saul Alinsky, his life and legacy

By Sanford D. Horwitt
New York, NY: Knopf : Distributed by Random House
1989
Pg. 296:
Marjorie Buckholz soon learned, however, that not many other Chelseans wanted the Puerto Ricans around.

Google Books
New York City ‘97:
On the loose, on the cheap, off the beaten path

New York, NY: Fodor’s
1996
Pg. 201:
Paradise Cafe. Hip Chelseans crowd Paradise — while their pooches wait dutifully outside.

Google Books
The Elements of Story:
Field Notes on Nonfiction Writing

By Francis Flaherty
New York, NY: HarperCollins Publishers
2009
Pg. 89:
This is a hip, edgy area of Manhattan, and there are some raunchy stores there already. What upsets many Chelseans about the new store is not its wares but its kitschy facade.

Curbed
Chelsea Market Expansion Unveiled: Offices, Hotel, Anger!
Tuesday, March 22, 2011, by Joey Arak
(...)
COMMENTS
Wangjing
#30. 03/24/11 01:15 AM
What an ugly mess. Looks 3rd Ave and 57th-ish. The developer certainly knows he can’t build it this big—aka—propose it BIG then hope everybody will ‘compromise’ on a smaller plan with the usual ‘public amenities.’ Oldest trick in the book. Note to West Chelseans: don’t assume developers can’t kill the fragile chemistry of your neighborhood. This proposal should show you it can happen.

Posted by Barry Popik
New York CityWorkers/People • Sunday, April 07, 2013 • Permalink