A plaque remaining from the Big Apple Night Club at West 135th Street and Seventh Avenue in Harlem.

Above, a 1934 plaque from the Big Apple Night Club at West 135th Street and Seventh Avenue in Harlem. Discarded as trash in 2006.

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Dead Meat (to be a loser or in serious trouble) (7/21)
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Entry from January 13, 2014
Disloyalty Card

A “loyalty card” rewards a business’s loyal customers. The Starbucks Card is one such loyalty card.

Local coffeeshops grouped together to counter Starbucks with their own “disloyalty card.” For example, if a person goes to eight different local coffeeshops (that are not Starbucks), the reward is a free coffee at any one of these coffeeshops. Gwilym Rhys Davies, a barista at Prufrock coffee in London, started the “disloyalty card” in 2009. The “disloyalty card” concept spread to coffeeshops in Florida and Washington, DC in 2013 and 2014.


Wikipedia: Loyalty program
Loyalty programs are structured marketing efforts that reward, and therefore encourage, loyal buying behavior – behavior which is potentially beneficial to the firm.

In marketing generally and in retailing more specifically, a loyalty card, rewards card, points card, advantage card, or club card is a plastic or paper card, visually similar to a credit card or debit card, that identifies the card holder as a member in a loyalty program. Loyalty cards are a system of the loyalty business model. In the United Kingdom it is typically called a loyalty card, in Canada a rewards card or a points card, and in the United States either a discount card, a club card or a rewards card. Cards typically have a barcode or magstripe that can be easily scanned, and some are even chip cards. Small keyring cards (also known as keytags) which serve as key fobs are often used for convenience in carrying and ease of access.

By presenting the card, the purchaser is typically entitled to either a discount on the current purchase, or an allotment of points that can be used for future purchases. Hence, the card is the visible means of implementing a type of what economists call a two-part tariff.

Wikipedia: Gwilym Davies (barista)
Gwilym Rhys Davies, (born February 1967) is a British barista.

Davies was born in Cheltenham, England, and grew up in Leeds, Yorkshire. Davies took the World Barista Championship crown in Atlanta, GA, USA in April 2009. Becoming well known for his coffee carts on Whitecross Street and Columbia Road as well as having started the Prufrock coffee concession in Present on Shoreditch High Street. Gwilym now runs a cafe and training facility on Leather Lane, London. Since 2013 Gwilym lives in Jílové u Prahy, Czech republic with his wife Czech barista Petra Veselá.

Jimseven (James Hoffmann’s blog)
Gwilym’s Disloyalty Card
DECEMBER 17TH, 2009
Let me start by saying that this has to be one of the best ideas I’ve seen in ages.  I’m very pleased and very excited by this.

Gwilym Davies – you know, the current World Barista Champion – has come up with a rather splendid card: the disloyalty card.

The idea is simple:  If you go and drink coffee at 8 interesting, quality focused cafes around (mostly) East London then he will say thank you by making you a coffee for free.

Eat Me Daily
Coffee Shop Disloyalty Card from Gwilym Davies
December 21, 2009, 6:00 pm
Genius idea out of England from Gwilym Davies, the 2009 World Barista Champion: the disloyalty card. In an attempt to promote East London’s emerging coffee shop scene, if you go and “drink coffee at 8 interesting, quality focused cafes,” then Gwilym Davies himself will make you a free cup of coffee.
—Raphael Brion

Start Up Blog
The worlds first disloyalty card
Posted in entrepreneurship by Steve Sammartino on March 3, 2011
Prufrock coffee who created the worlds first disloyalty card.

The card to encourages their clients to sample the wares of quality coffee shops around their local region in London. Which is completely counter intuitive to sound business practice.

How does it work?
If a disloyalty member tries all 8 coffees on the above card , it will earn you a free coffee at your next visit to Prufrock Coffee. The interesting part is that it was conceived to keep ‘coffee customers’ out of the four walls of the ever encroaching Starbucks behemoth. The disloyalty card created a community of coffee lovers that could compete the ‘way of an artisan’. Something Starbucks could never do. It might just help keep them out.  In this instance the community matters more than the trader. This is the new collaborative world we are in transition towards. A community who vest their interests in each other.

Exploring Coffee
MAY 14, 2013 · 6:53 PM
News
On a recent trip to Florida I came across this promotion in one of the few local coffee shops in West Palm Beach Florida. It is called a “Coffee Disloyalty Card”.  Here is how it works: Five locally owned shops joined forces to offer customers a free drink at any one of their shops after they buy one drink at each of the five individual coffee shops.

I think this is a fantastic idea and speaks to the sense of community between locally owned coffee shops. What is particularly interesting about this is that all of the shops listed on the card do not sell the same brand of coffee.

Washington (DC) Post
Curious coffee drinker? This (dis)loyalty card is for you.
BY ALEX BALDINGER
January 6, 2014 at 3:55 pm
Our wallets are already stuffed to the point of spontaneous explosion with loyalty cards: Buy nine oil changes, bagels, coffees, burritos, you name it, and if you’re doing it right, you might just get the 10th free.  Now here’s a chance to reward your wandering eye: the D.C. Disloyalty Card, for curious coffee drinkers.

Here’s how it works: Buy a coffee from each of six participating local shops and your seventh is free at whichever location you decide to go back to. Given the city’s thriving coffee culture, it’s an incentive to try the new roasts across town, even if you’re perfectly content with your weekday regular.

Eater
Get Disloyal with These Indie Coffee Shops
Monday, January 6, 2014, by Missy Frederick
Forget a loyalty card — how about a Disloyalty Card? That’s what Peregrine barista Dawn Shanks and her collaborator Christy Pelton are bringing to Washington.

The deal: Six different independent coffee shops have joined together to create a single rewards card. Customer can visit the shops, get a stamp with a purchase, and get a free coffee beverage when they’ve hit up all the places. Shanks has been working since the summer drumming up participation in the project, after seeing it work successfully in other cities.

Posted by Barry Popik
New York CityWork/Businesses • Monday, January 13, 2014 • Permalink