A plaque remaining from the Big Apple Night Club at West 135th Street and Seventh Avenue in Harlem.

Above, a 1934 plaque from the Big Apple Night Club at West 135th Street and Seventh Avenue in Harlem. Discarded as trash in 2006.

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Entry from March 23, 2015
“Don’t count the days, make the days count”

"Don’t count the days, make the days count” is a saying that has been printed on many posters, with credit often given to American boxer Muhammad Ali. If Ali ever said it, he wasn’t the first; Ali is credited since only about 1998.

“Don’t count the days—Make the days count” was one of several slogans used by Indiana University head football coach Clyde B, Smith (1906-1976) in 1950. Several college football coaches—such as Notre Dame coach Lou Holtz—have also used the inspirational saying.


Wikipedia: Clyde B. Smith
Clyde B. Smith (February 4, 1906 – July 9, 1976) was an American football player, coach, and college athletics administrator. He served as the head football coach at La Crosse State Teachers College—now the University of Wisconsin–La Crosse (1938–1942, 1946–1947), Indiana University (1948–1951), and Arizona State University (1952–1954), compiling a career college football record of 52–56–4. From 1955 to 1971, he was the athletic director at Arizona State.

11 September 1950, The Daily Herald (Jasper, IN), “Signs Of The Times, I. U. Gridders Hope” (INS), pg. 6, col. :
“Don’t count the days—Make the days count.”

5 October 1950, Cedar Rapids (IA) Gazette, “Red Peppers” by Pat Harmon, pg. 21, col. 1:
Another Smith (Clyde Smith, Indiana head football coach—ed.) motto reads like this;

“Don’t count the days—make the days count.”

16 November 1970, Boston (MA) Herald Traveler, “The Herald Traveler’s Readers Write,” pg. 24, col. 3:
In the paradox of life where every day in which we live a little, we die a little, it is not sufficient to count the days but rather to make the days count.
(Letter by John J. Connor of New Bedford.—ed.)

31 October 1976, Washington (DC) Star, “Israel,” pg. E-5, col. 3:
The players suffer Claiborne’s affection for slogans—“When you’re through improving, you’re through,” “Don’t count the days, make the days count,” and “If winning were easy, everyone would be a winner,” are among the many taped to the walls in the football building—without complaint.

Google Books
The Fighting Spirit:
A Championship Season at Notre Dame

By Lou Holtz with John Heisler
New York, NY: Pocket Books
1989
Pg. 95:
So we’ve said, “Don’t count the days, make the days count.”

Google Books
148 Motivational Minutes:
Insightful Ideas for Improving the Quality of Your Life

By Don Essig
Lombard, IL: Successories Pub.
1994
Pg. 93:
I once saw a sign hanging in a company office that read “Don’t merely count your days — make your days count.” Just look at all the folks who count their days to vacation, to retirement, to Saturday.

Google Groups: no.www
Et stort bilde, dårlig design på en hjemmeside?
Tore Aursand
4/14/98
(...)
“Don’t count the days, make the days count.”—Muhammed Ali

Google Books
I Read It on a Church Sign
By Jeffery W. Dukes
Published by Jeffery W. Dukes
2009
Pg. 141:
DON’T COUNT THE DAYS
MAKE THE DAYS COUNT

Twitter
HopeMagazine
‏@HopeMagazine1
Don’t count the days, make the days count - Muhammad Ali #Goodmorning #Todaysinspiration
12:21 AM - 24 Mar 2015

Posted by Barry Popik
New York CityTime/Weather • Monday, March 23, 2015 • Permalink