A plaque remaining from the Big Apple Night Club at West 135th Street and Seventh Avenue in Harlem.

Above, a 1934 plaque from the Big Apple Night Club at West 135th Street and Seventh Avenue in Harlem. Discarded as trash in 2006.

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“College is a fountain of knowledge where students gather to drink” (10/23)
Entry forthcoming—B.P. (10/23)
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Canadian Brainwashing Corporation (Canadian Broadcasting Corporation or CBC nickname) (10/23)
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Entry from March 19, 2014
“Fishing is a humbling sport”

Many sports have been described as a “humbling sport.” Fishing has been called a “humbling sport” because the fish can be biting one day and not biting the next—and there’s nothing one can do about that.

“Bass fishing is a humbling sport” was cited in print in 1987.


14 August 1987, Syracuse (NY) Herald-Journal, “Bass tourney humbles Reed” by Fred David, pg. D18, col. 3:
LOUISVILLE, Ky.—Bass fishing is a humbling sport. Fisherman can own the latest in high-tech gear and have memorized reams of scientific information about how and why fish bite, but when the fish aren’t feeding, there’s noting anyone—including fishing charter captains and touring bass fishing professionals—can do about it.

20 August 2004, Daily Herald (Chicago, IL), “Two fisherman angle for good showings at competitions” by Lisa Smith, sec. 5, pg. 1, col. 6:
He called fishing “the most humbling sport in the world.”

“You can be at the top of the world one day and the next day come in with no fish at all,” he said.
(Richard Lowitski, a competitor in a bass-fishing tournament.—ed.)

Canada.com
Fly-Fishing: Alberta rivers are world-famous
BY THE CALGARY HERALD JUNE 1, 2006
When his friend introduced him to fly-fishing about 10 years ago, Paul Primas was hooked.

It’s the challenge of the sport that draws this nature lover to the moving waters of southern Alberta in search of the elusive brown trout.

“It’s an incredibly humbling sport because you just never know what’s going to happen and sometimes you’re not going to catch anything—no matter what,” says Primas, 33. “You think you’ve got it figured out, then you won’t catch a thing.

23 May 2007, Daily Republican-Register (Mt. Carmel, IL), “Night Stalker hooks 27.62 pounds of Bass, wins state tournament” by Kimberly Laudano, pg. 4, col. 2:
Personal results aside, Pierce said that fishing is a very humbling sport. “You can go out there one day and do very well and the next day it’s just the opposite,” he said. “It’s very challenging and the competition is fun.”
(Staff Sgt. Mark Pierce, winner of the Tennessee Federation Nation State Championship Bass Tournament.—ed.)

Bassmaster
A humbling sport
By Alton Jones
JUN 16, 2010
(...)
Bass fishing is a humbling sport. I don’t care who you are or how much you fish, fishing gives you doses of humility like few other things can. That’s why it’s important to me to make sure your life is grounded in something other than success in fishing. These are the times when you rely on your faith and take notice of the things that are really important in life. I’m here with a part of my family, and that’s the most important thing.

ESPN Outdoors/Bassmaster
KVD’s World:
A humbling sport

Updated: April 8, 2011, 11:08 AM ET
By Kevin VanDam | BASS Member since 1975
Editor’s Note: VanDam entered Day Three of competition in 36th place.
As I write this, I’m mired in 61st place at the Alabama Charge on Pickwick Lake after Day One. It’s been awhile since I got off to such a horrible start, and I’m not happy about it.

Twitter
Randy Howell
‏@theRandyHowell
As the old saying goes, “Fishing is a humbling sport!” I took some big chances this week which is out of my… http://fb.me/152spSFVH
8:30 PM - 14 Mar 2014

Posted by Barry Popik
New York CitySports/Games • Wednesday, March 19, 2014 • Permalink