A plaque remaining from the Big Apple Night Club at West 135th Street and Seventh Avenue in Harlem.

Above, a 1934 plaque from the Big Apple Night Club at West 135th Street and Seventh Avenue in Harlem. Discarded as trash in 2006.

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Entry from May 10, 2009
Giardiniera

Entry in progress—B.P.

Wikipedia: Giardiniera
Giardiniera is an Italian or Italian-American relish of pickled vegetables in vinegar or oil.

Common vegetables in the Italian version, also called sotto aceti, include onions, celery, zucchini, carrots and cauliflower, pickled vegetables in red- or white-wine vinegar. It is typically eaten as an antipasto, or with salads.

However, in Chicago, giardiniera is a condiment, typically used as a topping on Italian beef sandwiches. It’s commonly made with sport peppers and some combination of other assorted vegetables, such as bell peppers, olives, celery, pimentos, carrots and cauliflower and sometimes crushed red pepper flakes, all marinated in vegetable oil, olive oil, soybean oil or any combination of the three oils.

The word giardiniera in Italian literally translates to “female gardener.” It is derived from the root giardino, which means “garden.”

Epicurious.com: Food Dictionary
giardiniera, alla
[ah-lah jahr-dee-NYAY-rah]
From the Italian giardiniere ("gardener"), culinarily this term refers to dishes served with mixed sliced vegetables.

Chicago (IL) Sun-Times: Chicagopedia
giardiniera
January 5, 2009
giardiniera /JYARD in year AH/ n. An Italian elixir that exponentially boosts the taste of sandwiches, especially Italian beef. It’s a marinated blend of oil and diced hot peppers, carrots, celery, cauliflower and olives, although recipes vary. It comes hot or mild. The word roughly translates to “woman of the garden” in Italian. Although homemade versions are said to date back centuries in Italy, it sprung up in Chicago in the 1920s as a condiment. Can be found in nearly every sandwich and Italian beef-serving joint in the Chicago area, but the oil-based variety is hard to find elsewhere.

Roadfood.com
Giardiniera
Preparation Time: 15 minutes
Cook Time: 0 minutes
Servings: 6
For many Italian beef eaters in Chicago, a lode of giardiniera atop the beef is as essential as the beef itself. Our recipe includes the “sport peppers” that are so popular at Chicago’s beef and hot dog stands, but any small, very hot pepper will do. Obviously adjust this to your taste ... but giardiniera should not be mild! 

Ingredients:
2 cups pitted green olives
1/2 large yellow onion, minced
2 cloves garlic, minced
2 carrots, peeled and diced fine
1 celery stalk, sliced 1/8 inch thick
1 cup fresh cauliflower, broken into small pieces
1 red bell pepper, diced
1/4 cup “sport” peppers (little green hot ones), or to taste
1 cup olive oil
2 teaspoons salt
1 teaspoon black pepper (...)

Google Books
Simple Italian Cookery
By Antonia Isola (Mabel Earl McGinnis—ed.)
New York, NY: Harper & Brothers
1912
Pg. 39:
Codfish “alla Giardiniera”
Take one pound of salted codfish, boil it, remove the skin and bones, and shred it. Then take one good carrot, one-half a turnip, scrape them, cut them into slices, and boil them for a few moments. Then drain off the water, and put them into a saucepan with one and one-half tablespoons of butter and finish cooking them, adding from time to time a little boiling water. When the vegetables are cooked add the coddfish, mix well, and serve.

4 June 1950, Dallas (TX) , part III, pg. 19 ad:
GIARDINIERA—Italian-type mixed vegetables in wine
Vinegar
Antipasto peppers in Olive Oil
Spiced Dilled Olives
(Simon David - Your Food Stylist—ed.)

1 July 1951, Dallas (TX) Morning News, part III, pg. 8 ad:
“GIARDINIERA”—EIght kinds of vegetables in wine vinegar, Italian-style...qt. jar .65
(Simon David - Your Food Stylist—ed.)

26 February 1953, Galveston (TX) Daily News, pg. 5, col. 1 ad:
ITALIAN STYLE
GIARDINIERA
(Mixed Vegetables)
Full Quart Jar 39c
(World Imports—ed.)

Google Books
Sunset Italian Cook Book
Published by Lane Books
1972
Pg. 11:
Giardiniera The canned pickled vegetables called giardiniera you see in fancy food stores and Italian delicatessens are easy to make at home.

The Spoon
Hot Italian Giardiniera - Chicago Style
Posted by Dave Budge under Condements, Italian, Veggies, Recipes on November 4th, 2007.
Giardiniera is Italian meaning “pickled vegetables” (from Italian “giardino” which means “garden” in English.) Usually when one finds giariniera outside of greater Chicago it means a mix of pickled peppers, cauliflower, carrots and pimiento. Although that has a nice application the vinegar based pickling juice is too tart for other applications. Hence, for things like hot dogs and Italian Beef Sandwiches an oil cured mix is preferable. Here’s how I make mine.

Ingredients:
1 lb fresh Serrano peppers - 1/8 inch slice
2 carrots - 1/4 inch dice
1 cup cauliflower - 1/4 inch dice
2 stalks celery - 1/8 inch slice
1 cup large green pitted olives - rough chop (Don’t be cheap - spring for the good ones.)
1 cup pickling salt.
2 tbs crushed oregano
1 tbs crushed chili flakes
1 tsp cracked black pepper
enough extra virgin olive oil to cover (...)

(Trademark)
Word Mark NAPLES STYLE TOMATO PASTE GIARDINIERA BRAND SALSA DI POMIDORO
Goods and Services (EXPIRED) IC 030. US 046. G & S: Tomato Paste. FIRST USE: 19221002. FIRST USE IN COMMERCE: 19221002
Mark Drawing Code (3) DESIGN PLUS WORDS, LETTERS, AND/OR NUMBERS
Design Search Code 02.03.13 - Cowgirl; Folk costumes (women wearing); Gypsies (women); Nuns; Women, other women wearing folk, historical or cowgirl costumes, including gypsies; nuns
02.03.25 - Fans (women holding); Hobos (women); Weapons (women carrying); Women, other women including hobos, women holding fans and armed women
02.09.06 - Carrying items, humans; Humans, including men, women and children, depicted toting items, such as buckets or bags; Toting items, humans
05.11.04 - Tomatoes
05.11.10 - Baskets of vegetables; Containers of vegetables
06.09.05 - Other cultivated areas
20.03.10 - Bottle labels; Labels for bottles
26.11.02 - Plain single line rectangles; Rectangles (single line)
26.11.20 - Rectangles inside one another
Serial Number 71173371
Filing Date December 15, 1922
Current Filing Basis 1A
Original Filing Basis 1A
Registration Number 0186862
Registration Date July 22, 1924
Owner (REGISTRANT) V. Taormina & Co. Firm composed of Vincent Taormina, Frank Taormina, Eugene Taormina (United States citizens) firm New Orleans LOUISIANA
(LAST LISTED OWNER) OGDEN FOOD PRODUCTS CORPORATION CORPORATION ASSIGNS THE ENTIRE INTEREST AND THE GOODWILL DELAWARE DRAWER J STOCKTON CALIFORNIA 95201
Assignment Recorded ASSIGNMENT RECORDED
Disclaimer No claim is made to any printed matter except the word “Giardiniera” or to the representation of the goods apart from the trade-mark shown on the drawing, applicant reserving all common law rights to the matter so disclaimed.
Type of Mark TRADEMARK
Register PRINCIPAL
Renewal 3RD RENEWAL 19840722
Live/Dead Indicator DEAD

Posted by Barry Popik
New York CityFood/Drink • (0) Comments • Sunday, May 10, 2009 • Permalink