A plaque remaining from the Big Apple Night Club at West 135th Street and Seventh Avenue in Harlem.

Above, a 1934 plaque from the Big Apple Night Club at West 135th Street and Seventh Avenue in Harlem. Discarded as trash in 2006.

Recent entries:
“Roses are red, violets are blue-ish. If it weren’t for Christmas, we’d all be Jewish” (1/20)
“When has a man a right to scold his wife about his coffee?"/"When he has sufficient grounds.” (1/20)
“When does a lawyer make coffee?"/"When he has sufficient grounds.” (1/19)
“Accordion to research, most people will not notice musical instruments appearing within sentences” (1/19)
“Yttrium barium copper oxide walks into a bar…” (bar joke) (1/19)
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Entry from June 01, 2005
“Hooverville” (1930)
During the Great Depression of the 1930s, shacks across the country were called "Hoovervilles" after then-President Herbert Hoover.

This appears to have begun in Chicago, not New York. The term is of historical interest today.

12 November 1930, New York Times, pg. 12:
CHICAGO, Nov. 11. - Hooverville, so-called by a colony of unemployed men, has sprung up in Chicago's front yard at the foot of Randolph Street near Grant Park, like one of the mushroom mining towns of bonanza days of the Far West.

16 November 1930, Los Angeles Times, pg. A7:
CHICAGO GETS
"SHANTY TOWN"
(...)
Shack Settlement Boasts
Name of "Hooverville"
Posted by Barry Popik
Neighborhoods • (0) Comments • Wednesday, June 01, 2005 • Permalink