A plaque remaining from the Big Apple Night Club at West 135th Street and Seventh Avenue in Harlem.

Above, a 1934 plaque from the Big Apple Night Club at West 135th Street and Seventh Avenue in Harlem. Discarded as trash in 2006.

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Entry from April 23, 2006
“Hot dogs, cold beer—it’s not complicated” (Schnack)
Schnack, at 122 Union Street in Brooklyn, offers a simple menu. Its motto is simple, too: "Hot dogs, cold beer -- it's not complicated."

http://www.tonykids.com/kidseats/
Schnäck
122 Union St between Columbia and Hicks Sts, Carroll Gardens (718-855-2879). Subway: F, G to Carroll St. Breakfast, lunch, dinner. Average main course: $5. Average kids' meal: $1.25. Kids' menu, high chairs.

Alan Harding and Jim Mamary (Patois, Gowanus Yacht Club) and partner Harry Hawk stick to basics. Their motto is "Hot dogs, cold beer—it's not complicated." You can go that simple, satisfying route, or branch out with a fish po'boy or Polish sausage. Last year, a new mini version of the restaurant opened in the Brooklyn Lyceum (225 Fourth Ave at Union St, Park Slope; 718-857-4816).

http://travel2.nytimes.com/top/features/travel/destinations/unitedstates/newyork/newyorkcity/restaurant_details.html?vid=1063097961392
Schnack
122 Union St.
Brooklyn , NY 11231-2908
Phone: (718) 855-2879 - Brooklyn
- Fast Food
- Hamburgers
(...)
In almost giddy counterpoint to Westville is a restaurant like Schnäck, a little storefront in Brooklyn near where Carroll Gardens merges into Red Hook. The small dining room is a dead ringer for an early 1960's rec room, decorated with seemingly found objects that are blessedly free of weighty themes except that they are old and kitschy. A blown-up baseball card of Johnny Podres, the old Dodgers pitcher, hangs across the room from a mural for Carling Black Label beer, which once represented class in suds. Old boxes of kosher salt stand in one corner, and a shelf holds a row of laminated plastic cups like those given away by gas stations in the 60's.

Like a semaphore, the brief menu hoists a motto to the top of the page: "Hot dogs, cold beer — it's not complicated." Is it a liberating credo? Or a sneer at those who would have you believe that short-order cooking is an art? I can't say I've decided, though the hot dogs are just fine.
(...)
From "$25 and Under: Meeting Low Expectations, Happily," The Times, 9/10/03.
-The New York Times

http://cityguide.aol.com/newyork/dining/venue.adp?sbid=118015628
You're in the land of high-concept at Schnack. In this case the concept is "boutique White Castle." On this westernmost shoal of Union St., where the harbor laps at your ankles, the minds behind the Gowanus Yacht Club, Patois and Zombie Hut have crafted ode to backyard cuisine. Hamburgers start at $.99 and come freshly fried on a bun with a side of half-sour pickle. There's a slate of options -- all of them typical with the exception of the Schnack sauce, which, though shrouded in mystery, tastes a lot like french dressing. Hot dogs loom large as well, with seven varieties of tubesteak, including one that claims to be vegan-friendly, although the meat fumes here alone are enough to put any vegan off his or her vows. And to drink? Beer. Preferably in a can. There's also a selection of drafts by the glass -- ranging in size from the whopping 19-ounce glass to the "children's portion" which goes for the low, low price of $1. Besides the backyard BBQ, Schnack offers sausages, eggs and a few entrees like fish and chips, fried squid and a pork chop plate. Like the menu says, "Hot dogs, cold beer -- it's not complicated." -- Adam Mazmanian (Photo: Noah Kalina)

Posted by Barry Popik
Restaurants/Bars/Bakeries/Food Stores • (0) Comments • Sunday, April 23, 2006 • Permalink