A plaque remaining from the Big Apple Night Club at West 135th Street and Seventh Avenue in Harlem.

Above, a 1934 plaque from the Big Apple Night Club at West 135th Street and Seventh Avenue in Harlem. Discarded as trash in 2006.

Recent entries:
“A consultant is someone who lives out of town” (7/25)
“I’ll have burnt toast and cold coffee” (restaurant customer joke) (7/25)
“No one gets sick on Wednesdays” (7/25)
“My family’s in the iron and steel business” (joke) (7/24)
“Why are there no knock-knock jokes about the U.S.?"/"Because freedom rings.” (7/24)
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Entry from May 30, 2006
“It’s 10 p.m. Do you know where your children are?”
Channel 5 (then WNEW, now FOX) has a 10 o'clock newscast. Before each newscast appeared the public service announcement: "It's 10 p.m. Do you know where your children are?"

The announcement (created in 1969) became very popular and was quickly imitated across the country.

10 July 1969, Los Angeles Times, pg. 29:
Parents...
Do you know where your children are?
(Ad for Delta Billiard Tables -- ed.)

5 February 1970, Washington Post, "College Theater Raises Curtain" by Richard L. Coe, pg. C10:
Fittingly, a student-created musical will be the opening attraction that Tuesday, running through the 21st, with a Saturday matinee. This is by Cary Engleberg and Lewis Black, "Do You Know Where Your Children Are?"
(George Washington University -- ed.)

6 November 1972, Los Angeles Times, "Country Park, a Family Complex," pg. F45:
Parents, do you know where your children are?

8 January 1973, Los Angeles Times, "Teen Camp-out at Junior Arts Center," pg. F1:
Here it was, after midnight, the thermometer on the Hertz sign down the street reading 43 degrees, and -- DO YOU KNOW WHERE YOUR CHILDREN ARE TONIGHT? -- there must have been 50 of 'em loose in Barnsdall Park.

17 March 1974, Chicago Tribune, pg. F7:
Do you know where your children are? They may be out picketing for children's liberation,
5 October 1975, Washington Post, pg. 48:
"You used to ask, 'Do you know where your children are?' What happened, you don't ask it anymore?"
-- Viewer letter to WTTG-TV.

13 June 1976, New York Times, "Endpaper" by Glenn Collins, pg. 212:
101 things to love about New York City
(...)
12. It's 10 P.M. Do you know where YOUR children are?

12 June 1977, New York Times, "Film View" by Vincent Canby, pg. 83:
It's mid-June, 1977 -- do you know where your children are?

19 September 1977, New York Times, "Twigs" by Hortense Calisher, pg. 35:
"Do you know where your children are?" flashes the TV, that public-service arbiter.

27 October 1977, Los Angeles Times, pg. J32:
It's 10 a.m. Saturday...do you know where your children are?

6 January 1978, New York Times, pg. B4:
"It is 10 P.M. Parents, do you know where your children are?"

31 March 1979, New York Times, pg. 21:
When the TV says "it's ten o'clock. Do you know where your children are?" I start asking myself.

16 November 1980, Los Angeles Times, pg. G3:
"It is 11 o'clock, and there's a curfew in Atlanta. Do you know where your children are?"

4 July 1982, New York Times, pg. SM10:
This is why I paid no attention at first when that voice coming out of the television set nightly at 10 o'clock said, "It's 10 P.M. Do you know where your children are?"

21 May 1984, New York Times, pg. A17 ad:
Channel 5's community involvement initiated the Jerry Lewis Telethon. It pioneered Focus Spots that cut through racial and economic barriers, giving the public a chance to be heard. It inspired Big Apple Minutes. And raised the question, now echoed in various forms throughout the country, "It's 10PM. Do You Know Where Your Children Are?"
(...)
5
WNEW-TV
FORTY YEARS OF FINE TUNING
METROMEDIA NEW YORK

6 June 1988, New York Times, pg. C18:
Switch on Channel 5
"It's 10 P.M. Do you know where your children are?" For nearly 20 years, that question has confronted viewers on Channel 5. It has caught on far beyond New York, sometimes in forms altered by stand-up comedians.

But last April the message changed: "Did you read to your child today?" Some sign of the times? No, the station says. Just a temporary switch, during its public service literacy campaign. The old question is to return next Monday.

30 October 1988, New York Times, "Mother Takes Envious Look at Chaperoning of 18-Year-Olds" by Evelyn Jackson, pg. WC30:
I especially feel it at night when the Channel 5 announcer asks: It is 10 o'clock. Do you know where your children are?"

1 June 1992, New York Times, "'The 10 O'Clock News' Gives a Nod to Its Past" by Walter Goodman, pg. C13:
The producers of "The 10 O'Clock News" -- probably most famous for bringing show-business personalities and hopefuls on to declare: "It's 10 P.M. Do you know where your children are?" -- take credit for putting forth an "intense," "gritty," "in-your-face" newscast that challenged the establishment or even waged guerrilla war on it.

(Trademark)
Word Mark IT'S 10 P.M., DO YOU KNOW WHERE YOUR CHILDREN ARE? 5
Goods and Services (ABANDONED) IC 038. US 104. G & S: TELEVISION BROADCASTING SERVICES. FIRST USE: 19690600. FIRST USE IN COMMERCE: 19690000
Mark Drawing Code (3) DESIGN PLUS WORDS, LETTERS, AND/OR NUMBERS
Design Search Code 02.01.30 - Business suits (men wearing); Men wearing two or three piece business suits
16.01.03 - CB radios; Projection screens (television); Radios; Remote controls, television; Screens, projection; Screens, television; Television sets
Serial Number 73498985
Filing Date September 12, 1984
Current Filing Basis 1A
Original Filing Basis 1A
Owner (APPLICANT) METROMEDIA, INC. CORPORATION DELAWARE ONE HARMON PLAZA SECAUCUS NEW JERSEY 07094
Assignment Recorded ASSIGNMENT RECORDED
Attorney of Record HOWARD C. MISKIN
Type of Mark SERVICE MARK
Register PRINCIPAL
Live/Dead Indicator DEAD
Abandonment Date August 23, 1988


Posted by Barry Popik
Radio/Television • (0) Comments • Tuesday, May 30, 2006 • Permalink