A plaque remaining from the Big Apple Night Club at West 135th Street and Seventh Avenue in Harlem.

Above, a 1934 plaque from the Big Apple Night Club at West 135th Street and Seventh Avenue in Harlem. Discarded as trash in 2006.

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Entry from June 03, 2014
Knork (knife + fork)

A “knork” (pronounced “nork") is a combination of a “knife” and a “fork.” The utensil name “knork” has been cited in print since at least 1987 and 1990, although the idea for a combined knife and fork is much older. Michael D. Miller (of Knork.net) trademarked “knork” with a first use in commerce of June 19, 2002.


Knork.net
What is Knork?
A Knork Education

Innovative creativity can come from anywhere. And that is what happened the day Mike Miller went to a pizzeria with friends and struggled to eat pizza neatly with a normal fork--while trying to impress the ladies joining them for dinner. He noticed an employee using a pizza slicer, imagined how that functionality could exist on his fork, and the rest is flatware history.

KNORK Flatware is ergonomically designed to correctly fit the way we naturally eat. Its patented design combines innovation and function to produce a complete line of modern flatware designed with comfort, style and stability in mind. Each piece features attributes unique to KNORK including smooth stem fingertip platforms, ergonomic shape and a heavier, balanced design that won’t bend or fall from a plate.

Google Books
Logan’s Medical and Scientific Abbreviations
By Carolynn M. Logan and M. Katherine Rice
Philadelphia, PA: Lippincott
1987
Pg. 293:
knork
KNife and fORK (re: physiatry)

Google Books
Tableware
By Jeremy Myerson and Sylvia Katz
New York, NY: Van Nostrand Reinhold
1990
Pg. 70:
The designers worked with medical experts to develop a fork with serrated knife edge, the ‘knork’. for people with only one hand. The other implement is a ‘knoon’, a combined knife and spoon; it cuts up food with a twisting movement and has a deep bowl to prevent spilling

Google Books
Landmarks of Twentieth-Century Design:
An Illustrated Handbook

By Kathryn B. Hiesinger and George H. Marcus
New York, NY: Abbeville Press
1993
Pg. 273:
The “knork,” a fork with a serrated knife edge (available in left- and nght-hand models), and the “knoon,” a knife- spoon combination, are both designed for cutting food either with short strokes or by twisting; the curved edge of the knoon is easier to use than the tines of the knork and is suited to those with greater impairment.

Twitter
Valentino Valdez
‏@valdezign
http://www.knork.net/ a knife plus a fork. fascinating.
2:48 AM - 5 Nov 2008

Twitter
Richard Smyth
‏@RSmythFreelance
Knork. RT @ChirurgeonsAppr: Combined fork and knife, used by soldier amputees. 19th century. pic.twitter.com/YvBWE63Ftb
5:11 AM - 14 Mar 2014

Food Republic
Jun 3, 2014 10:00 am
Move Over, Spork. Meet The Knork, Part Knife And Park Fork.
A new party-friendly utensil for one-handed eating

BY LAURA NEILSON
Yes, you can hold that beer and eat at the same time. Whether you’ve only got one hand to spare, or you’ve found yourself knife-less with a plate of steak and gigantic potato wedges, one-handed eating just got so much easier with the recently debuted Knork.

It’s clear we love a good food-related mash-up (case in point: the now-trademarked Cronut, or even something as unlikely as Turducken), but the Knork, pronounced “nork,” is much more about smart functionality than of-the-moment gimmickry. Basically, it’s a stainless steel fork that’s been modified ever so subtly to have to the ability cut up foods like flatbreads and pizza, raw vegetables and even tender cuts of meat. Unlike a knife, there’s no blade, though — who really wants to stick an actual blade in their mouth? — just a beveled edge that’s safe to touch, but slices with serious efficacy when you use it in a typical cutting fashion.

(Trademark)
Word Mark KNORK
Goods and Services IC 021. US 002 013 023 029 030 033 040 050. G & S: EATING UTENSILS AND CUTLERY, NAMELY FORKS, KNIVES AND SPOONS, AND FORKS AND SPOONS HAVING BEVELED AND SHARPENED SIDE EDGES. FIRST USE: 20011001. FIRST USE IN COMMERCE: 20020619
Mark Drawing Code (1) TYPED DRAWING
Serial Number 76449883
Filing Date July 5, 2002
Current Basis 1A
Original Filing Basis 1A
Published for Opposition April 8, 2003
Registration Number 2731950
Registration Date July 1, 2003
Owner (REGISTRANT) Miller, Michael D. INDIVIDUAL UNITED STATES 1802 South Longford Ct. Wichita KANSAS 67207
(LAST LISTED OWNER) PHANTOM ENTERPRISES, INC. CORPORATION 101 S. Evans NEWTON KANSAS 67114
Assignment Recorded ASSIGNMENT RECORDED
Attorney of Record Robert O. Blinn
Type of Mark TRADEMARK
Register PRINCIPAL
Affidavit Text SECT 15. SECT 8 (6-YR). SECTION 8(10-YR) 20130321.
Renewal 1ST RENEWAL 20130321
Live/Dead Indicator LIVE

Posted by Barry Popik
New York CityFood/Drink • Tuesday, June 03, 2014 • Permalink