A plaque remaining from the Big Apple Night Club at West 135th Street and Seventh Avenue in Harlem.

Above, a 1934 plaque from the Big Apple Night Club at West 135th Street and Seventh Avenue in Harlem. Discarded as trash in 2006.

Recent entries:
“Great people talk about ideas, average people talk about things, and small people talk about wine” (11/30)
Entry forthcoming—B.P. (11/30)
Statue of King George III (Bowling Green; erected 1770, destroyed 1776) (11/30)
Statue of Liberty (Liberty Enlightening the World) (11/30)
“Ten percent of my ashes shall be handed to my agent” (show business joke) (11/30)
More new entries...

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Entry from May 31, 2006
Little Jamaica; Little Kingston
"Little Jamaica" is used infrequently, although New York City has many immigrants from Jamaica. "Little Kingston" (after Kingston, Jamaica's capital city) is even less frequently used.

New York City is home to the largest Jamaican diaspora of all, with a large community along Flatbush avenue in Brooklyn—centered around the neighborhoods of Prospect Heights, Prospect Lefferts Gardens and Flatbush. The Bronx also has a significant Jamaican ex-pat community. Flatbush Avenue features several miles of Jamaican cuisine, markets, nightlife and residential enclaves.

I grew up in "Little Jamaica," a West Indian neighborhood in the Bronx's northeast section. I was a sheltered bookworm, unaware of much of the drama that lurked around my own corner--save for the occasional boom of bullets at midnight.

A realtor who didn't show for a house viewing because he didn't think I was serious about living in what he so condescendingly refers to as "Little Jamaica" (aka Crown Heights);
In New York, I lived just blocks from the area in Brooklyn known as "Little Kingston," so I was familiar with their ways and had friends who were from "J," as they referred to the island.
Posted by Barry Popik
Neighborhoods • (0) Comments • Wednesday, May 31, 2006 • Permalink