A plaque remaining from the Big Apple Night Club at West 135th Street and Seventh Avenue in Harlem.

Above, a 1934 plaque from the Big Apple Night Club at West 135th Street and Seventh Avenue in Harlem. Discarded as trash in 2006.

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Entry from May 11, 2013
Little Tibet or Himalayan Heights (Jackson Heights, Queens)

Jackson Heights, Queens, has been known as “Little India,” but there are also immigrants from Tibet and Nepal. The website Little Tibet in New York wrote about a Tibetan food pushcart on May 1, 2008.

A New York magazine—Grub Street article, “Little Tibet Rising in Queens,” on June 1, 2011, gave two new nicknames for Jackson Heights:

“he stretch of 74th Street between Roosevelt and 37th Avenues in Jackson Heights is often referred to as Little India. But given the recent influx of Tibetan and Nepalese restaurants — there are now at least a dozen of them in the area, including Tibetan Mobile, a space-challenged cell-phone store with an equally tiny five-item kitchen in back — means it might be time for a name change. We’re thinking Little Tibet, though Himalayan Heights has a nice ring to it.”

Queens food writer Joe DiStefano offered food tours of “Himalayan Heights” in 2012. DiStefano frequently writes about “Himalayan Heights” on the blog QueensNYC.


Wikipedia: Jackson Heights, Queens
Jackson Heights is a neighborhood in the northwestern portion of the New York City borough of Queens. The neighborhood is part of Queens Community Board 3. The main ZIP code of Jackson Heights is 11372.
(...)
Jackson Heights is among the most diverse neighborhoods in New York City, and the nation. Jackson Heights is home to large numbers of South Americans, particularly Argentinians, Colombians, South Asians,and East Asians.

Little Tibet in New York
THURSDAY, MAY 1, 2008
Shangri-La Express Serves Tibetan Food Out Of A Pushcart
The only known Tibetan puschcart is parked outside the 74th Street train station in Jackson Heights.


New York magazine—Grub Street
Little Tibet Rising in Queens
By: Jeff Orlick
6/1/11 at 10:30 AM
The stretch of 74th Street between Roosevelt and 37th Avenues in Jackson Heights is often referred to as Little India. But given the recent influx of Tibetan and Nepalese restaurants — there are now at least a dozen of them in the area, including Tibetan Mobile, a space-challenged cell-phone store with an equally tiny five-item kitchen in back — means it might be time for a name change. We’re thinking Little Tibet, though Himalayan Heights has a nice ring to it. In any event, if it’s been a few years since you’ve gotten off at the Jackson Heights subway stop, you might want to check it out.

Random Notes: Geographer-at-Large
Tuesday, June 21, 2011
The New “Littles”: Mapping ethnic enclaves in NYC
(...)
Little Tibet in Woodside, Queens

Lhakar Diaries
OUR DAY (SHOPPING) IN NEW YORK’S LITTLE TIBET
December 22, 2011 by Lhakar Diaries
(...)
Yesterday was Wednesday, and we decided to spend a day together for Lhakar in Jackson Heights, Queens – also known as “Little Tibet.” We wanted to support the local Tibetan businesses.

Queens Love
posted 01 June, 2012
by jeffsayyes
Some still think of it as Little India, but as far as I’m concerned Himalayan Heights is a better moniker for Jackson Heights-Elmhurst area is as evidenced by the proliferation of Tibetan and Nepalese restaurants. That and the fact that what was once St. Matthew’s Lutheran Church (41-01 75 St.) now houses the United Sherpa Association. And the melting pot churns on…

Serious Eats
Take a Tour of Himalayan Heights with Queens Expert Joe DiStefano
The Serious Eats Team
JUN 19, 2012
1:00 PM
Jackson Heights has been dubbed “Little India” for decades, but these days the Himalayan food is some of the most interesting. A community of Tibetan and Nepalese immigrants have made the neighborhood their home, and they’ve brought their food with them (most famously: momos).

QueensNYC
07/10/12 11:00am
Top 7 dumplings in Queens: Flushing and Jackson Heights
by Joe DiStefano
(...)
Steamed momo, Potala Fresh Momo – Jackson Heights - Momo, the steamed beef dumplings that are Tibet’s national food, are quite common in the ever-increasing number of Tibetan restaurants in Himalayan Heights.

Serious Eats
Joe DiStefano’s Himalayan Heights: Touring Tibetan and Nepali Food in Queens
Max Falkowitz
SEP 21, 2012
9:00 AM
“When people ask me where to get Indian food in Jackson Heights, I say they should go to the Himalayan places instead. That’s what’s exciting here now.”

Joe DiStefano, the guy who’s forgotten more about the food in my home borough of Queens than I’ve ever tasted, has told me this before. Since we’ve been celebrating Himalayan food all week, I decided it was finally time to make him show me first hand just what he meant. So Robyn and I took off to meet him for a whirlwind tour of the neighborhood we thought we knew, which over the past ten years has become such a hub of Himalayan food and culture that he’s taken to calling it Himalayan Heights.

New York’s Himalayan food encompasses both Tibetan and Nepali cuisines, many times in the same restaurant.

QueensNYC
02/07/13 11:00am
Tibetan Dumplings Get Twice as Nice in Himalayan Heights
by Joe DiStefano
Momo—the beef dumplings beloved of Tibetans—are everywhere in Himalayan Heights. So popular are the crimped top little packages that I have taken to calling the neighborhood’s Tibetan restaurants momo parlors. For more than five years there has been a lone food cart stationed underneath an Indian jewelry store where momos were steamed day and night. In that time halal food carts and trucks have proliferated along 73rd St., but for the longest time there was just that one momo cart.

Posted by Barry Popik
New York CityNeighborhoods • Saturday, May 11, 2013 • Permalink