A plaque remaining from the Big Apple Night Club at West 135th Street and Seventh Avenue in Harlem.

Above, a 1934 plaque from the Big Apple Night Club at West 135th Street and Seventh Avenue in Harlem. Discarded as trash in 2006.

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Entry from June 12, 2014
New World Wine

“Old World wine” has been cited in print since at least 1897 and has meant wine that is imported from Europe. Terms such as “American wine” or “California wine” were originally used for wine that is not “Old World wine.” The term “New World wine” was cited infrequently in the 1970s, since at least 1977. “New World wines are rubbing shoulders with the best of Old World wines,” was said in 1984 by Robert Mondavi, a leader of the California wine industry.

Wine Spectator‘s “Ask Dr. Vinny” explained in 2014:

“The rule of thumb held by Thomas Matthews, our executive editor, is that Old World wine regions grow mostly indigenous grapes, while New World regions rely mostly on imported grapes. This puts Greece, for example, into the Old World, but Israel into the New World, counterintuitive as that may seem.”


Wikipedia: New World wine
New World wines are those wines produced outside the traditional wine-growing areas of Europe and the Middle East, in particular from Argentina, Australia, Canada, Chile, New Zealand, South Africa and the United States.
(...)
Characteristics of New World wines
Style

Since New World vineyards are generally in hotter climates than those of Northern Europe - in fact some major New World regions are irrigated desert - New World grapes tend to be riper. Thus New World wines tend to be correspondingly more alcoholic and full-bodied. Critics such as Robert M. Parker, Jr. have influenced New World producers and consumers towards a fruitier style, with more use of new oak. However in recent years there has been a reaction against some of the very oaky, alcoholic styles that typified late 1980s Australian Chardonnays for example, as cooler vineyards have been identified and winemakers have become more sophisticated and more restrained.

Wine Spectator—Ask Dr. Vinny
June 11, 2014
Dear Dr. Vinny,
Who initially coined the phrase “New World wine”?
—J.R., Texas

Dear J.R.,
(...)
As I’ve written before, the terms started off as a way to not only describe the origin of a wine, but also to indicate a style based on climate expectations—namely, that New World wines were typically grown in warmer climates, with riper flavors. But these days, the terms are more muddied than ever, with a more diverse set of regions, winemakers, methods and changing climates that makes these words more and more confusing. The rule of thumb held by Thomas Matthews, our executive editor, is that Old World wine regions grow mostly indigenous grapes, while New World regions rely mostly on imported grapes. This puts Greece, for example, into the Old World, but Israel into the New World, counterintuitive as that may seem.

31 July 1977, Sunday Advocate (Baton Rouge, LA), “The Real Sauternes Sparkles at Desert” by Tom Gable (Copley News Service), pg. 6-D, col. 3:
Some New World wine marketing organizations have attached the name of Sauternes to domestic sweet white wines, whose only resemblance to their namesake is that neither is red.

9 February 1984, Dallas (TX) Morning News, “Bright future for American wine lovers” by Erika Sanchez, pg. 1E, col. 1:
The high quality of California wines was universally recognized by the experts at the meeting. “New World wines are rubbing shoulders with the best of Old World wines,” said Robert Mondavi, a leader of the California wine industry.

2 June 1991, Mobile (AL) Press Register, “Australia quietly matures” by Desmond Balmer (London Observer Service), pg. 24-A, col. 3:
We have tended to associate New World wines with big, brassy flavors, but the French know that the Australians produce wines of sophistication.

OCLC WorldCat record
Tony Aspler’s guide to new world wines : the most comprehensive guide to the wines of the United States, Canada, Mexico, South America, Australia, New Zealand and South Africa.
Author: Tony Aspler
Publisher: Toronto : McGraw-Hill Ryerson, ©1996.
Edition/Format: Book : English

OCLC WorldCat record
The ‘New World’ Wine Revolution
Author: R Nicholson
Edition/Format: Article Article : English
Publication: AUSTRALIAN AND NEW ZEALAND WINE INDUSTRY JOURNAL, 11, no. 1, (1996): 71-77
Database: British Library Serials

7 March 1996, Winnipeg (Manitoba) Free Press, “In the Cellar” by Thoms Batchelder, magazine sec., pg. 30, col. 2:
Now, while, in the past, beginning wine lovers have always looked to the red of France (Bourgogne, Bourdeaux, the Loire and the Rhone) for their first red wines experiences, today’s budding wine lover in search of vinous thrills is just as likely to cut his/her teeth on the “New World” wines of California.

OCLC WorldCat record
New world wines : the complete guide
Author: Julie Arkell
Publisher: London : Cassell, 1999.
Edition/Format: Book : English
Database: WorldCat
Summary:
Written by the highly respected wine expert and television presenter, the book gives “detailed accounts of the many different viticultural regions and countless individual vineyards that make up the New World wine industry. New World Wines also contains essential background information on climate, history and the latest trends in winemaking methods."--Jacket.

OCLC WorldCat record
The relative abilities of the `Old’ and `New World’ wine producers to meet the future marketing challenge
Publisher: [Adelaide, S.A.: Ryan Publications,
Edition/Format: Article Article : English
Publication: The Australian grapegrower & winemaker : journal of the Australian wine industry. no. 455, (2001): 80-85
Database: ArticleFirst

Twitter
Broken Earth Winery
‏@brokenearthwine
Who initially coined the phrase “New World wine”? http://goo.gl/eDddaE via @WineSpectator #wine
8:01 PM - 12 Jun 2014

Posted by Barry Popik
New York CityFood/Drink • Thursday, June 12, 2014 • Permalink