A plaque remaining from the Big Apple Night Club at West 135th Street and Seventh Avenue in Harlem.

Above, a 1934 plaque from the Big Apple Night Club at West 135th Street and Seventh Avenue in Harlem. Discarded as trash in 2006.

Recent entries:
“What did the Jedi order at the Italian restaurant?"/"Only one cannoli.” (8/22)
“If self driving cars become a huge industry, ice cream trucks will be mobile vending machines” (8/22)
“Paper money is cold hard cash. A credit/debit card is hold card cash” (8/22)
“I haven’t seen faith move mountains, but I have seen what faith can do to buildings” (8/22)
“Vegans think people who sell meat are disgusting, but people who sell fruit and veg are grocer” (8/22)
More new entries...

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Entry from March 28, 2005
Theatre of the Absurd, 2005
This is how it's been for about ten years now:
...
...
4 March 2005, Tulsa World, "Historical facts," pg. A18:
"The big what?" (Feb. 25) about the new campaign by New York City to call itself The World's Second Home ends by citing the current nickname, The Big Apple. The writer says: "Stick with 'The Big Apple.' It has more class."

I had to chuckle as I did a Google search on the origin of the nickname while teaching American Culture to my students at the Petroleum University of East China last year. The origin may have something to do with certain anatomical features of the ladies at a house of ill repute in the early days of the city.
(...)
Linda Shindler, Ponca City

I asked Gerald Cohen to write this one. Tell Tulsa World the truth, that this is a hoax, that "Big Apple" has absolutely nothing to do with a woman's vagina, that you're supposed to look at more than one site when you search the web, that "Big Apple" actually comes from an African-American who has never been honored, that it actually does have class.

Gerald Cohen wrote a simple letter. He was not contacted about it. The letter was not published.

And ask I myself, why do we do this? We don't get money. It's not our job.

Why does no one in New York City help us?

Posted by Barry Popik
Public Advocate (1993 election) • (0) Comments • Monday, March 28, 2005 • Permalink