A plaque remaining from the Big Apple Night Club at West 135th Street and Seventh Avenue in Harlem.

Above, a 1934 plaque from the Big Apple Night Club at West 135th Street and Seventh Avenue in Harlem. Discarded as trash in 2006.

Recent entries:
Entry forthcoming—B.P. (9/22)
“Coffee! Because crack isn’t allowed in the workplace!” (9/22)
“Only those who dare to fail greatly can ever achieve greatly” (9/22)
“People are putting names on food in the company fridge” (joke) (9/21)
“This office will not tolerate redundancy in this office” (9/21)
More new entries...

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Entry from May 03, 2014
“Two managers talk to each other”

Entry in progress—B.P.

Elk Grove Online
City of Elk Grove Executive Branch ~ Too Top Heavy?
Deleted Member
November 15, 2006 7:53:38 PM PST
(...)
My paper was entitled “Why Businesses Suffer from Dolly Parton’s Disease?” And the best line I could find to describe “top heavy management” was an old adage: “One manager talks to his workers. Two managers talk to each other. Three managers form a club.”

Post-Bulletin (Rochester, MN)
Dave Conrad: Isolation tough for managers
Posted: Thursday, May 1, 2014 9:00 am
(...)
Managers need diverse opinions and ideas. There is an old saying: “One manger talks to his/her workers. Two managers talk to each other.” This can lead to “seclusion delusion” where the manager receives information from a small number of people, who tend to think alike.

Posted by Barry Popik
New York CityWork/Businesses • Saturday, May 03, 2014 • Permalink