A plaque remaining from the Big Apple Night Club at West 135th Street and Seventh Avenue in Harlem.

Above, a 1934 plaque from the Big Apple Night Club at West 135th Street and Seventh Avenue in Harlem. Discarded as trash in 2006.

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Entry from April 29, 2009
Waldorf Hysteria (Waldorf-Astoria Hotel nickname)

New York’s Waldorf-Astoria Hotel is infrequently called the “Waldorf Hysteria.” When a popular celebrity or political figure stays in the Waldorf, newspaper headlines often describe the “Waldorf hysteria.”


Wikipedia: Waldorf-Astoria Hotel
The Waldorf-Astoria Hotel is a famously luxurious hotel in New York. It has been housed in two historic landmark buildings in New York City. The first, designed by architect Henry J. Hardenbergh, was on the Fifth Avenue site of the Empire State Building. The present building at 301 Park Avenue in Manhattan is a 47 story, 625 ft. (191 m) Art Deco landmark, designed by architects Schultze and Weaver and dating from 1931. The Waldorf Astoria New York is a member of Hilton’s Luxury and Lifestyle Brands along with The Waldorf=Astoria Collection, Conrad Hotels & Resorts and Denizen Hotels. The Waldorf Astoria brand consists of the Waldorf Astoria in New York and The Waldorf Astoria Orlando.

The hotel is now branded as the Waldorf=Astoria, with a double hyphen, but originally a single hyphen was employed between Waldorf and Astoria, as recalled by a popular expression and song, “Meet Me at the Hyphen”.

The modern hotel has three American and classic European restaurants, and a beauty parlor located off the main lobby. Several boutiques surround the distinctive lobby, which has won awards for its restoration to the original period character. An even more luxurious, virtual “hotel within a hotel” in its upper section is known as The Waldorf Towers operated by Conrad Hotels & Resorts.

The hotel has its own railway platform as part of Grand Central Terminal, used by Franklin D. Roosevelt, Adlai Stevenson, and Douglas MacArthur, among others. An elevator large enough for Franklin D. Roosevelt’s automobile provides access to the platform.

Google Books
Do you believe in magic?: the second coming of the sixties generation
By Annie Gottlieb
New York, NY: Times Books
1987
Pg. 39:
“The first demonstration I went to was against Nixon coming to the Waldorf-Hysteria, I mean Astoria, to accept a football award as Man of the Year, or some bullshit like that.”

TV.com
Johnny Bravo (Cartoon Network)
Air Date: Monday August 25, 1997
Welcome to the Waldorf Hysteria!:
The hotel where Johnny goes to spend the night to in the episode The Day the Earth Didn’t Move Around Very Much is called the Waldorf Hysteria, and is a reference to the famous Waldorf-Astoria Hotel.

13 June 2001, Washington (DC) Post, “Adding to Manhattan’s Mythology”:
Will and his friends take possession of the city as they must by renaming that hotel of Park Avenue, “The Waldorf Hysteria,” or “The Museum of Unnatural History.”

Village Voice (NY)
Checking in for Waldorf Hysteria
Free Traders and Fair Traders in Stalemate as CEOs Converge on New York

Lenora Todaro
Tuesday, December 25th 2001
Tuxedo junction: the Waldorf, where the swank ranks will meetWhen you enter the Waldorf-Astoria Hotel through the Park Avenue lobby, you step upon a 148,000-piece tile mosaic, “The Wheel of Life,” which depicts the drama of human existence. Above you are 13 allegorical murals—fishermen hauling in their catch and the like. In surrounding shops, there are diamond necklaces to purchase, art from Sotheby’s. Titans of the business and tourist elites sink into plushy wingbacks canted toward the two-ton 19th-century clock, which rings on the quarter hour. The cost of a hotel suite ranges from $265 to $670 per night.

New York (NY) Times
Bagels, Lox, Lollipops and Smelling Salts
By ALEX WITCHEL
Published: Wednesday, March 3, 2004
(...)
As for those groups of 400, no one was talking hard figures, but Scott Woldman, social catering director at the Waldorf-Astoria—which he likes to call the Waldorf Hysteria—described the bris in the Grand Ballroom, given by a proud grandfather in honor of his first grandson.

Apartment Therapy (June 15, 2006)
Waldorf Hysteria - CLOSED
As far as we are aware, this store is now closed. 8/18/08 - CB

Nestled in the East Village, we passed Waldorf Hysteria and had to stop. The pic is snapped from our cell phone and all the goods on the street were interesting vintage finds.

New York (NY) Times
Possessed
There’s No Bag Like Home

By DAVID COLMAN
Published: October 15, 2006
(...)
One day he was strolling down Avenue B in the East Village when he passed the vintage shop Waldorf Hysteria, and ... well, read on. “I heard this voice screaming, squeaking at me, saying: ‘Come buy me! Come buy me!’ ”

Google Books
Waldorf Hysteria:
Hotel Manners, Misbehaviour and Minibars

By Fritz Gubler
Published by Great Grand Famous Pty Ltd., 2008

RushLimbaugh.com
Michelle’s Afternoon at the Waldorf
October 17, 2008
RUSH: I found something interesting here about the Page Six business regarding the Obamas at the Waldorf-Hysteria hotel.

RushLimbaugh.com
Great Manager Obama Didn’t Know About the Air Force One Photo-Op?
April 28, 2009
RUSH:  That’s just miraculous, just amazing.  He didn’t know.  He’s the only one who can fly on this airplane.  Nobody can put the wheels in motion to get Air Force One off the ground, other than Barack Obama.  If they’re gonna do a flight like this, he has to be told because he has to also know he can’t travel that day on that airplane.  Now, if he’s just going to take a jaunt up to the Waldorf Hysteria or something, get on a 757, whatever plane he gets on is Air Force One…

Posted by Barry Popik
New York CityHotels • Wednesday, April 29, 2009 • Permalink


I heard that a certain night clerk shared his room to the Waldorf couple when they weren’t able to get a room in the city or town they visited. And in return for his kind deed, the couple built a hotel that he can manage. And that was the 1st Waldorf Hotel. Is this true?

Posted by Florinda  on  04/22  at  12:58 PM

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