A plaque remaining from the Big Apple Night Club at West 135th Street and Seventh Avenue in Harlem.

Above, a 1934 plaque from the Big Apple Night Club at West 135th Street and Seventh Avenue in Harlem. Discarded as trash in 2006.

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Entry from September 07, 2007
“You can trust your car to the man who wears the star” (Texaco ad jingle)

"You can trust your car to the man who wears the star” has been Texaco’s advertising jingle from 1962 (not the 1940s, as incorrectly listed on some websites). The Texaco advertising (by the Benton & Bowles firm) has made the “top 100” in an Ad Age list of the century’s best advertising. The song jingle was created by Harlem musician Roy Eaton.


Ad Slogans
Texaco

Oh, we’re the men of Texaco.
We work from Maine to Mexico.
There’s nothing like this Texaco of ours;
Our show tonight is powerful,
We’ll wow you with an hourful
of howls from a showerful of stars;
We’re the merry Texaco-men!
Tonight we may be showmen;
Tomorrow we’ll be servicing your cars!”
--Opening Jingle from The Milton Berle Show

“Texaco tower of power.”

“You can trust your car to the man who wears the star” (Benton & Bowles, 1940s)

Wikipedia: Texaco
Texaco is the name of an American oil retail brand with a strong global presence. Its history of more than 100 years and the enduring performance of its products have made Texaco one of the most iconic brands worldwide. Its flagship product is its fuel, Texaco with Techron.

Texaco was an independent company until it merged into Chevron Corporation in 2001. It began as the Texas Fuel Company, founded in 1901 in Beaumont, Texas by Joseph S. Cullinan, Thomas Donahue, Walter Benona Sharp and Arnold Schlaet upon discovery of oil at Spindletop. For many years, Texaco was the only company selling gasoline in all 50 states, but this is no longer true. Its logo features a white star in a red circle (a reference to the lone star of Texas), leading to the long-running advertising jingles “You can trust your car to the man who wears the star” and “Star of the American Road.”
(...)
1962 - Texaco introduces the “You Can Trust Your Car To The Man Who Wears The Star” campaign. Both Fire Chief and Sky Chief gasolines are promoted as “Climate Controlled” as various blends of both gasolines are distributed to Texaco stations in various parts of the country.

Handbook of Texas Online
TEXACO. Texaco, Incorporated, known for many years as the Texas Company, was founded in 1902 at Beaumont by oilman Joseph S. Cullinan and New York investor Arnold Schlaet. In March 1901 Cullinan, with two other promoters, incorporated the Texas Fuel Company at Beaumont. Prominent investors included the Hogg-Swayne Syndicate, John W. Gates, and the Laphams of New York. The company primarily purchased and transported oil from Beaumont’s Spindletop oilfield. In April 1902 the Texas Fuel Company’s major investors obtained a new charter for a corporation-to be known as the Texas Company-which authorized the company to engage in storage and transportation of mineral solutions. On May 1 the Texas Fuel Company conveyed its assets to the new company and was dissolved shortly afterward. The Texas Company was initially capitalized at $3 million and almost immediately began expanding operations. It used subsidiary companies for oil production and began acquiring barges and rail tank cars. It quickly covered new fields with leases. High production levels at two fields just outside Houston, the Sour Lake oilfield (1903) and the Humble oilfield (1905), provided the company with a secure financial base. In 1905 the Texas Company linked these two fields by pipelines to Port Arthur, ninety miles away, and built its first refinery there. That same year the company acquired an asphalt refinery at nearby Port Neches. In 1908 the company completed the ambitious venture of a pipeline from the Glenn Pool, in the Indian Territory (now Oklahoma), to its Southeast Texas refineries. 

Answers.com: Roy Eaton
Roy Eaton
Born 1930 in Harlem, NY
Country: USA
Biography
Just about anyone who watches television knows the music of Roy Eaton. His ad jingles are classics of the genre, and if you’re not old enough to have seen them aired during their heyday, they can still be seen in reruns on nostalgia networks like TV Land. While catchy product advertisements like the ones he wrote for Texaco ("You can trust your car to the man who wears the star") and Beefaroni ("We’re having Beefaroni, it’s made with macaroni") paid Eaton’s bills, they don’t begin to tell his musical story.

Eaton was the offspring of Jamaican immigrants. His mother worked in domestic service and his father worked as a mechanic. He grew up during jazz’s glory years in the Harlem community of Sugar Hill. Eaton took up classical piano when he was six. His skillful handling of Chopin brought him the Kosciuszko Foundation’s Chopin Award in 1950. Following an education that included the City College of New York, the Manhattan School of Music, the University of Zurich, and Yale, he became a music instructor at his Manhattan alma mater.

The pianist and composer almost didn’t live to make his mark. In 1957, physicians gave him a 10 percent chance of surviving an automobile accident that left him comatose and took the life of his bride, to whom he’d been wed for less than a year. The shattering experience strengthened his faith. He has since been a devotee of Transcendental Meditation.

He devoted almost three decades to his advertising work, first with the firm of Young & Rubicam during the late ‘50s and later with Benton & Bowles.

17 March 1962, Portsmouth (OH) Times, pg. 18, col. 5 ad:
TRUST YOUR CAR TO THE MAN
Who Wears The Star
That’s Texaco Service
MORITZ TEXACO

3 May 1963, Dallas Morning News, section 2, pg. 2:
Trust your car to the man who wears the star.
TEXACO

10 March 1968, New York Times, “Advertising” by Philip H. Dougherty, pg. F19:
Now he is sitting in the chair of president and chief executive officer of Benton & Bowles.
(...)
Among his favorites of the agency’s campaigns are Texaco’s “You can trust your car to the man who wears the star,” and Instant Maxwell House’s “Cup and a half of flavor.”

Ad Age Advertising Century
TOP 100 ADVERTISING CAMPAIGNS
(...)
85. Texaco, “You can trust your car to the men who wear the star”, Benton & Bowles, 1940s

Bruce Springsteen - The Vinyl Vaults
I don’t know about you, but my first introduction to the wide world of unauthorised recordings was visiting a little dingy backstreet store in Manchester UK back in 1976. Inside was a thin youth with long hair, a lot of jos-sticks and row upon row of records mainly from TAKRL, TMOQ etc. I came across a record called, You Can Trust Your Car To The Man Who Wears The Star, by Bruce Springsteen with a wonderful bright green cover and a tremendous line art drawing and bought it. Well the rest is quite literally history, and thats what I aim to capture here - the complete vinyl history of Bruce’s live records on bootleg - with appropriate references to source material and comment on the quality and historical value of the LP’s in question.

Bruce Springsteen bootleg albums
TITLE: YOU CAN TRUST YOUR CAR TO THE MAN WHO WEARS THE STAR
DETAILS: Main Point, Pa 5/2/75

(Trademark)
Word Mark THE TEXACO STAR
Goods and Services (EXPIRED) IC 016. US 038. G & S: [ MONTHLY ] * PERIODICAL * PUBLICATION. FIRST USE: 19131115. FIRST USE IN COMMERCE: 19131115
Mark Drawing Code (5) WORDS, LETTERS, AND/OR NUMBERS IN STYLIZED FORM
Serial Number 71207697
Filing Date January 5, 1925
Current Filing Basis 1A
Original Filing Basis 1A
Change In Registration CHANGE IN REGISTRATION HAS OCCURRED
Registration Number 0198541
Registration Date May 19, 1925
Owner (REGISTRANT) TEXAS COMPANY, THE CORPORATION TEXAS HOUSTON TEXAS
(LAST LISTED OWNER) TEXACO INC. CORPORATION BY CHANGE OF NAME FROM DELAWARE 2000 WESTCHESTER AVENUE WHITE PLAINS NEW YORK 10650
Assignment Recorded ASSIGNMENT RECORDED
Type of Mark TRADEMARK
Register PRINCIPAL
Affidavit Text SECT 12C. SECT 15.
Renewal 3RD RENEWAL 19850604
Live/Dead Indicator DEAD

(Trademark)
Word Mark THE TEXAS COMPANY
Goods and Services (EXPIRED) IC 004. US 015. G & S: [PETROLEUM WAXES, WAX-OIL STOCK, ASPHALT OILS (DISTILLED CRUDE PETROLEUM OILS FOR LUBRICATING PURPOSES), CUTTING OILS, CRUDE PETROLEUM, CUP GREASE, FUEL OILS, A DISTILLATE OF CRUDE PETROLEUM, AND CRUDE OIL FROM WHICH MOST VOLATILE HYDROCARBONS HAVE BEEN REMOVED FOR USE IN INTERNAL-COMBUSTION ENGINES; GAS OILS, PETROLEUM DISTILLATES OF HEAVIER GRAVITY THAN KEROSENE,] GASOLINE, [LUBRICATING GREASES, KEROSENE, NAPHTHA, PETROL, ILLUMINATING OILS, LUBRICATING OILS, ROAD OILS, SOLAR OILS (A PETROLEUM DISTILLATE FOR LUBRICATING PURPOSES), PARAFFIN ENGINE OILS, MOTOR OILS, MOTOR SPIRITS, GASOLINE-LIKE SUBSTANCES, PETROLEUM DISTILLATES, AND PARAFFIN]. FIRST USE: 19020407. FIRST USE IN COMMERCE: 19020407
Mark Drawing Code (1) TYPED DRAWING
Serial Number 71160213
Filing Date March 4, 1922
Current Filing Basis 1A
Original Filing Basis 1A
Change In Registration CHANGE IN REGISTRATION HAS OCCURRED
Registration Number 0163541
Registration Date January 16, 1923
Owner (REGISTRANT) TEXAS COMPANY, THE CORPORATION TEXAS 17 BATTERY PLACE NEW YORK NEW YORK
Assignment Recorded ASSIGNMENT RECORDED
Attorney of Record WILLIAM P. WALSH
Type of Mark TRADEMARK
Register SUPPLEMENTAL
Renewal 2ND RENEWAL 19680105
Live/Dead Indicator DEAD

Posted by Barry Popik
Texas (Lone Star State Dictionary) • (1) Comments • Friday, September 07, 2007 • Permalink


well i think its not a man who wears the star is the issue but how did he convey the car and if its whether the car is still in good condition or not.

Posted by auto parts  on  06/14  at  09:01 PM

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