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Entry from February 15, 2013
Great Rebalancing

The financial term “Great Rebalancing” was cited by Newsweek on June 26. 2006:

“I think we’ll look back and 2006 will seem possibly like the middle phase of what you might call the Great Reconvergence, the Great Rebalancing, of world economic power.”

The term is similar to other financial terms, such as “Great Depression,” “Great Recession,” “Great Reckoning” and “Great Reset.” “Great Rebalancing” was popularized after the financial crisis of 2008; “Not a Great Depression, a Great Rebalancing” by Umair Haque appeared in Businessweek on October 17, 2008.

Several books have “Great Rebalancing” in the title, such as The Great Rebalancing: Trade, Conflict, and the Perilous Road Ahead for the World Economy (2013) by Michael Pettis.


26 June 2006, Newsweek, “Seeing the Bright Side” by Stefan Theil in Berlin, et al.:
I think we’ll look back and 2006 will seem possibly like the middle phase of what you might call the Great Reconvergence, the Great Rebalancing, of world economic power.

OCLC WorldCat record
Losing our marbles in the new century? : the great rebalancing in historical perspective
Author: Christopher M Meissner; Alan M Taylor
Publisher: Cambridge, MA : National Bureau of Economic Research, Oct. 2006.
Series: NBER working paper, no. 12580.
Edition/Format: eBook : Document : English

Businessweek
Not a Great Depression, a Great Rebalancing
By Umair Haque on October 17, 2008
Umair Haque says the good news is we’re not looking at a depression. The bad news: Stagnation isn’t so easy to fix

OCLC WorldCat record
The Economy: The Great Rebalancing With the world finally inching out of recession, the rules of global markets are being rewritten. We asked 55 of the world’s top economists to tell us what to think
Edition/Format: Article : English
Publication: FOREIGN POLICY -WASHINGTON- no. 187, (2011): 58-59
Database: British Library Serials

OCLC WorldCat record
The Great Rebalancing
Author: Abe de Ramos
Edition/Format: Article : English
Publication: CFA Magazine, v22 n4 (201107): 32-36
Database: CrossRef

Business Insider
Re-Balancing Organizational Structures By Putting Employees First
Vineet Nayar, HCL Technologies | Aug. 3, 2011, 9:13 AM
We have often read that the recent “great depression” has led to a “great rebalancing.” Highly respected analysts at McKinsey, Morgan Stanley and Deloitte have all dissected and discussed various ways in which organizations, companies and societies witnessing rebalancing in the aftermath of the downturn.

OCLC WorldCat record
The great rebalancing : how to fix the broken economy
Author: Andrew Harrop; Fabian Society (Great Britain); Foundation for European Progressive Studies.
Publisher: London : Fabian Society ; Belgium : Foundation for European Progressive Studies, 2013.
Edition/Format: Book : English

OCLC WorldCat record
The great rebalancing : trade, conflict, and the perilous road ahead for the world economy
Author: Michael Pettis
Publisher: Princeton : Princeton University Press, ©2013.
Edition/Format: Book : English

Zero Hedge
The Great Rebalancing: 10 Things To Watch In 2013
Submitted by Tyler Durden on 02/14/2013 19:26 -0500
The great trade, capital flow and debt imbalances that were built up over the preceding two decades must reverse themselves. Michael Pettis notes, however, that these imbalances can continue for many years, but at some point they become unsustainable and the world must adjust by reversing those imbalances. One way or the other, in other words, the world will rebalance. But there are worse ways and better ways it can do so. Pettis adds that, any policy that does not clearly result in a reversal of the deep debt, trade and capital imbalances of the past decade is a policy that cannot be sustained. It is likely to be political considerations that determine how quickly the rebalancing processes take place and whether they do so in ways that set the stages for future growth or future stagnation. Pettis’ guess is that we have ended the first stage of the global crisis, and most of the deepest problems have been identified. In 2013 we will begin to see how policymakers respond and what the future outlook is likely to be. The following 10 themes are what he will be watching this year in order to figure out where we are likely to end up.

Authored by Michael Pettis: What I’ll Be Watching In 2013,

I’ll be watching a number of things in 2013 in order to get a better sense of what the future will bring. On January 22 Princeton University Press will be publishing my book, The Great Rebalancing: Trade, Conflict, and the Perilous Road Ahead, and in the last chapter of the book I argue that the great trade, capital flow and debt imbalances that were built up over the preceding two decades must reverse themselves. Imbalances can continue for many years, I argue, but at some point they become unsustainable and the world must adjust by reversing those imbalances.

Posted by Barry Popik
New York CityBanking/Finance/Insurance • Friday, February 15, 2013 • Permalink


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