A plaque remaining from the Big Apple Night Club at West 135th Street and Seventh Avenue in Harlem.

Above, a 1934 plaque from the Big Apple Night Club at West 135th Street and Seventh Avenue in Harlem. Discarded as trash in 2006.

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Chip Butty (7/15)
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Entry from July 05, 2004
“Big Apple” in Kurt Vonnegut Jr.’s Slaughterhouse-Five (1969)
Just before Charles Gillett's campaign revived "Big Apple" in the 1970s, there is one important citation. The New-York Historical Society liked it enough to put it on its web page.

From Kurt Vonnegut Jr.'s Slaughterhouse-Five, or The Children's Crusade: A Duty-Dance With Death (1969; Delta Trade Paperbacks 1999), pg. 265:

"You've been time-traveling again. I can always tell."

"Um."

"Where did you go this time? It wasn't the war. I can tell that, too."

"New York."

"The Big Apple."

"Hm?"

"That's what they used to call New York."

"Oh."
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New York CityThe Big Apple1960s: Fun City • Monday, July 05, 2004 • Permalink