A plaque remaining from the Big Apple Night Club at West 135th Street and Seventh Avenue in Harlem.

Above, a 1934 plaque from the Big Apple Night Club at West 135th Street and Seventh Avenue in Harlem. Discarded as trash in 2006.

Recent entries:
Torpedo Soup (Malaysian bull’s penis soup) (2/17)
Khachapuri (Georgian cheese-filled bread) (2/17)
“Did you hear about the carpenter who drank too many screwdrivers? He got hammered” (2/17)
“Did you hear about the carpenter who drank on the job? He got hammered” (2/17)
Wok Chi (wok energy) (2/16)
More new entries...

A  B  C  D  E  F  G  H  I  J  K  L  M  N  O  P  Q  R  S  T  U  V  W  X  Y  Z


Entry from October 20, 2006
Dobe (also Dobie, Doby) Biscuit

"Dobe” biscuits (also “dobie” or “doby") are sourdough biscuits. The name was used by the 1870s and is largely of historical interest today. “Dobe” is said to come from “abode” bricks, but the word also might come from “doughboy.”


(Historical Dictionary of American Slang, A-G)
dobe biscuit, n. Army, a hardtack biscuit.
1931 1931 R.G. Carter Border 41 [ref to ca1870]: Our supper at night consisted of broiled wild turkey thighs, larded with bacon slivers, and buffalo sweetbreads, with “doby” biscuits and coffee. 

November 1885, United Service, “Scouting on the ‘Staked Plains’ (Llano Estacado) with MacKenzie, in 1874,” pg. 534:
...and the command had its breakfast, for which all hands were ready, so far as appetite was concerned, after the morning ride,—albeit, the breakfast was composed of fried bacon, soldier coffee without milk, and doby biscuits, which were discussed and enjoyed with a relish that many a millionaire might envy.

Texas Home Cooking
by Cheryl Alters Jamison and Bill Jamison
Boston: Harvard Common Press
1993
Pg. 157:
Cowboys loved their sourdough biscuits so much they nicknamed them “doughgods.” When they wanted to nettle the cook, a common pastime, they might call his biscuits “sinkers,” “hot rocks,” or “dobies,” the latter a reference to the density and weight of adobe bricks.

Posted by {name}
Texas (Lone Star State Dictionary) • (0) Comments • Friday, October 20, 2006 • Permalink