A plaque remaining from the Big Apple Night Club at West 135th Street and Seventh Avenue in Harlem.

Above, a 1934 plaque from the Big Apple Night Club at West 135th Street and Seventh Avenue in Harlem. Discarded as trash in 2006. Now a Popeye's fast food restaurant on Google Maps.

Recent entries:
“Never underestimate the importance of being properly caffeinated” (9/17)
“I almost caught COVID yesterday, but I quickly stood on a social distancing sticker” (9/17)
Entry in progress—BP (9/17)
“I know several jokes in sign language. I guarantee nobody has ever heard them” (9/17)
“People who used to be late and blamed it on traffic are still late to their Zoom meetings” (9/17)
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Entry from August 21, 2015
“A tenement house in Greenwood” (soup with greens)

New York City had some unusual restaurant slang in the 19th century. This term was heard on the Bowery and appeared in the New York (NY) Herald in 1888:

“That ‘a tenement house in Greenwood’ meant a plate of soup with plenty of greens in it.”

“Greenwood” is used for “greens,” but there is no evidence that this plate of soup has anything in particular to do with Greenwood Heights, Brooklyn.


15 April 1888, The Sunday Herald (Boston, MA), pg. 17, col. 6:
RESTAURANT SLANG.
During his stay in a cheap Bowery restaurant a New York Herald reporter learned several things he never knew before. Among others:
(...)
That “a tenement house in Greenwood” meant a plate of soup with plenty of greens in it.

Posted by Barry Popik
New York CityFood/Drink • Friday, August 21, 2015 • Permalink