A plaque remaining from the Big Apple Night Club at West 135th Street and Seventh Avenue in Harlem.

Above, a 1934 plaque from the Big Apple Night Club at West 135th Street and Seventh Avenue in Harlem. Discarded as trash in 2006.

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Entry from April 20, 2006
Baseball cards (Queens)=Tickets (Brooklyn)
Baseball cards are popular all over the country. But why is (or was) the game called "tickets" in Brooklyn? The following citation is the only one I have on this.

8 July 1977, New York Times, "Street Opens Avenues of Imagination for Games" by Fred Ferretti, pg. 54:
Just as nobody really knows why hide-and-seek is called "tap the icebox" in Chicago, or why Johnny-on-a-pony is "bumbay" in St. Louis, or why "baseball cards" in Queens is "tickets" in Brooklyn, or why the old game of marbles in Manhattan is called "fatty-box" in Boston. Even a modified "Dennis the Menace" is called sardines in the outback.
Posted by Barry Popik
Sports/Games • (0) Comments • Thursday, April 20, 2006 • Permalink