A plaque remaining from the Big Apple Night Club at West 135th Street and Seventh Avenue in Harlem.

Above, a 1934 plaque from the Big Apple Night Club at West 135th Street and Seventh Avenue in Harlem. Discarded as trash in 2006.

Recent entries:
“Chefs are hard-working, talented artists. And we all turn their best efforts into shit” (4/18)
“Want to stop drunk drivers from killing sober drivers? Ban sober drivers. That’s gun control” (4/18)
“We are all a little broken. But last time I checked, broken crayons still color the same” (4/18)
“Broken crayons still color” (4/18)
“Sometimes we’re tested, not to show our weakness, but to discover our strength” (4/18)
More new entries...

A  B  C  D  E  F  G  H  I  J  K  L  M  N  O  P  Q  R  S  T  U  V  W  X  Y  Z


Entry from May 26, 2018
Burma Road (Asian restaurants on 52nd Street, between 6th and 7th Avenues)

Syndicated newspaper columnist Walter Winchell (1897-1972) wrote in a column in September 1948:

“There are so many chow mein places on 52nd Street between 6th and 7th now—the midnight-to-sun-up set calls it Burma Road.”

“Burma Road” was a famous supply line to China during the Second Sino-Japanese War (1937-1945). The name “Burma Road” does not have any other known citations and is of historical interest today.


Wikipedia: Burma Road
The Burma Road (Chinese: 滇缅公路) was a road linking Burma with the southwest of China. Its terminals were Kunming, Yunnan, and Lashio, Burma. It was built while Burma was a British colony in order to convey supplies to China during the Second Sino-Japanese War. Preventing the flow of supplies on the road helped motivate the occupation of Burma by the Empire of Japan in 1942. Use of the road was restored to the Allies in 1945 after the completion of the Ledo Road. Some parts of the old road are still visible today.

24 September 1948, Newark (NJ) Star-Ledger, “On Broadway” by Walter Winchell, pg. 33, col. 1:
There are so many chow mein places on 52nd Street between 6th and 7th now—the midnight-to-sun-up set calls it Burma Road.

June 1949, Hearst’s International Combined with Cosmopolitan (New York, NY), “Winchell’s New York,” pg. 53:
There are so many chow mein places on 52nd Street between 6th and 7th now—the midnight-to-sun-up set calls it Burma Road.

Posted by Barry Popik
New York CityStreets • Saturday, May 26, 2018 • Permalink