A plaque remaining from the Big Apple Night Club at West 135th Street and Seventh Avenue in Harlem.

Above, a 1934 plaque from the Big Apple Night Club at West 135th Street and Seventh Avenue in Harlem. Discarded as trash in 2006. Now a Popeye's fast food restaurant on Google Maps.

Recent entries:
“Maybe serial killers are just regular people on the keto diet” (8/12)
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Entry in progress—BP (8/12)
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Entry in progress—BP (8/12)
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Entry from July 15, 2020
Chin Sail (face mask)

Entry in progress—B.P.

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Seattle (WA) Times
Everyone wore masks during the 1918 flu pandemic. They were useless.
April 2, 2020 at 4:32 am Updated April 2, 2020 at 5:42 am
By Eliza McGraw
The Washington Post
People called them “flu fences” and “chin sails.” Gala attendees fastened theirs with gaudy earrings. Smokers cut flaps in them, and movie houses gave them away with tickets.

During the influenza pandemic of 1918, officials often advised Americans to wear face masks in public. Doctors believed that masks could help prevent “spray infections,” according to historian John M. Barry in his book, “The Great Influenza: The Story of the Deadliest Pandemic in History.”

Posted by Barry Popik
New York CityGovernment/Law/Politics/Military • Wednesday, July 15, 2020 • Permalink