A plaque remaining from the Big Apple Night Club at West 135th Street and Seventh Avenue in Harlem.

Above, a 1934 plaque from the Big Apple Night Club at West 135th Street and Seventh Avenue in Harlem. Discarded as trash in 2006. Now a Popeyes fast food restaurant on Google Maps.

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Entry from February 04, 2022
Copaganda (cop + propaganda)

"Copaganda” (cop + proaganda) is a portmanteau word suggesting that law enforcement uses the news media and entertainment to portray police (cops) in a positive light.

“English: POLICE PUBLICITY Thinklish: COPAGANDA” was featured in a Lucky Strike cigarette advertisement in The Lincoln Clarion (Jefferson City, MO) on February 27, 1959, but the term did not catch on at this time.

“It’s what I call copaganda” (spoken by British Columbia attorney Sheldon Goldberg) was printed in the Windsor (ON) Star on May 9, 2002. Outside court, (Sheldon—ed.) Goldberg said the police strategy of holding news conferences on minor charges is ‘copaganda’” was printed in the Daily News (Nanaimo, BC) on March 10, 2009. ”copaganda The police strategy of holding news conferences on minor charges to make it appear as though they are making progress in the War on Crime / War on Drugs / War on Guns / War on Gangs” was entered in the Urban Dictionary on March 10, 2009.


Wikipedia: Copaganda
Copaganda, a portmanteau of cop and propaganda, is a phenomenon described by critics of law enforcement in which news media and other social institutions promote celebratory portrayals of police officers with the intent of swaying public opinion for the benefit of police departments and law enforcement. Copaganda has been defined as “media efforts to flatter police officers and spare them from skeptical coverage,” “pieces of media that are so scarily disconnected from the reality of cops that they end up serving as offbeat recruitment ads,” and “videos, photos, and news clips of police officers dancing, praying, or handing out free food” used to boost public relations. Copaganda has been described as promoting an image of police officers that does not reflect reality, especially for working class Indigenous, Black, and brown communities, and reinforcing racist misconceptions worldwide. The term is commonly used on social media platforms such as Twitter.

Newspapers.com
27 February 1959, The Lincoln Clarion (Jefferson City, MO), pg. 2, col. 2 ad:
English: POLICE PUBLICITY
Thinklish: COPAGANDA
(A Lucky Strike cigarette advertisement features several coined words of “Thinklish.”—ed.)

Newspapers.com
9 May 2002, Windsor (ON) Star, “Confession is ‘copaganda:’ Lawyer” by Terri Theodore (The Canadian Press), pg. A11, col. 3:
“It’s what I call copaganda.”
(Sheldon Goldberg, an attorney.—ed)

Newspapers.com
10 March 2009, Daily News (Nanaimo, BC), “Accused charges police with ‘copaganda’” by Kim Bolan (Canwest News Service), pg. A6, col. 4:
Outside court, Goldberg said the police strategy of holding news conferences on minor charges is “copaganda.”
(Sheldon Goldberg, an attorney.—ed)

Urban Dictionary
copaganda
The police strategy of holding news conferences on minor charges to make it appear as though they are making progress in the War on Crime / War on Drugs / War on Guns / War on Gangs.
(...)
by Rumpole March 10, 2009

Twitter
Graham
@6loss
Unimpressed by anti-terror headlines replacing G20 death on all but 2 papers today. Suspicious. #copaganda
9:17 AM · Apr 9, 2009·Twitter SMS

Twitter
William McClymont
@theboldyin
Sick of all these Copaganda shows on TV. Are these the same cops that hide in vans every weekend and take 45 mins to respond to 999 calls?
3:32 PM · Aug 21, 2009·Twitter Web Client

Urban Dictionary
copaganda
1. Propaganda released by police or sheriff’s departments which present a rosey view of what police work entails.
2. Images of police officers rescuing kittens from trees and fixing children’s bicycles.
3. Articles written about “hero” cops who save lives but ignore all of the tazer deaths and corruption in the unit.
4. The group think or gang mentality that is displayed by some members of the police force which asserts that police can do no wrong and are therefore above the laws they are supposed to enforce.
(...)
by TWP (typical white person) October 15, 2009

Daily Dot
Just say no to viral ‘copaganda’ videos
Don’t let the literal song and dance fool you.

Brenden Gallagher Brenden Gallagher IRL Published Jul 25, 2018 Updated Feb 28, 2020, 3:21 pm CST
If you are Facebook friends with conservative family members or co-workers, you’ve probably seen it in your feeds: Videos, photos, and news clips of police officers dancing, praying, or handing out free food. Just last week, a video of cops lip-syncing to “Uptown Funk,” while grooving through their station, went viral. While this all might seem like harmless fun, the internet has a word for this kind of media: copaganda.

YouTube
#DailyShow #TrevorNoah #CopShows
Copaganda - How Cop Shows Lie to You | The Daily Social Distancing Show
Jun 26, 2020
The Daily Show with Trevor Noah
Trevor looks at how depictions of police in film and TV can skew public perception of cops and glorify officers who break laws and use violence unnecessarily on the job. #DailyShow #TrevorNoah #CopShows

Twitter
[Heart] suitoftheKurds
@exodia_in_hand
Replying to @LMelendezNews and @OmahaPolice
Copaganda: a phenomenon described by critics of law enforcement in which news media @WOWT6News and other social institutions promote celebratory portrayals of police officers with the intent of swaying public opinion for the benefit of police departments and law enforcement.
11:30 PM · Feb 4, 2022·Twitter for iPhone

Posted by Barry Popik
New York CityGovernment/Law/Military/Religion /Health • Friday, February 04, 2022 • Permalink