A plaque remaining from the Big Apple Night Club at West 135th Street and Seventh Avenue in Harlem.

Above, a 1934 plaque from the Big Apple Night Club at West 135th Street and Seventh Avenue in Harlem. Discarded as trash in 2006.

Recent entries:
“Why was the cat so small?"/"Because it only ate condensed milk.” (3/16)
“Why did the diner send back the rabbit stew?"/"Because it had a hare in it.” (3/16)
Entry forthcoming—B.P. (3/16)
“Who turns the lights off on Halloween?"/"The light’s witch.” (3/16)
“Give a man a job, you have an employee. Teach him how to shift blame, you have a manager” (3/16)
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Entry from July 13, 2005
"Fare beaters" are those people who jump subway turnstiles and don't pay the subway fare. New subway technology has cut down on some types of "fare-beating," but it still exists.

19 February 1977, New York Times, pg. 21:
Chief Garelick was told to take the men from his 200-man fare-evasion unit which has been guarding the turnstiles against fare-beaters - a program he has called a cornerstone of his anticrime efforts,

20 January 1979, New York Times, "About New York" by Francis X. Clines, pg. 24:
Another fare-beater, a suspected courier in some branch or not-quite-organized crime, was found to be carrying $30,000 in cash.

Whatever the turnstile dragnets turn up, the clerks in the 42d Street booth scoff at Chief Garelik's claim that the volume of fare-beating has been cut from about 4 percent of ridership to less than 1 percent.

18 January 1985, Washington Post, "New York Chafes at Criminal Image" by Margot Hornblower, pg. A3:
Much of what sets the tone are things that seem trivial, like subway graffiti. Farebeaters.
Posted by Barry Popik
Workers/People • (0) Comments • Wednesday, July 13, 2005 • Permalink