A plaque remaining from the Big Apple Night Club at West 135th Street and Seventh Avenue in Harlem.

Above, a 1934 plaque from the Big Apple Night Club at West 135th Street and Seventh Avenue in Harlem. Discarded as trash in 2006.

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Entry from November 02, 2008
Fried Twinkie

The “Twinkie” cake was invented in the 1930s in the Midwest, but the deep-fried Twinkie was invented in Brooklyn. Christopher Sell (originally from England) opened a Brooklyn fish & chips restaurant called the Chip Shop. He experimented with frying other foods and the deep-fried Twinkie was born.

The fried Twinkie was described in a May 15, 2002 article in thew New York (NY) Times; other newspapers also wrote about the food item and the fried Twinkie was quickly popularized at state fairs across America. An isolated “fried Twinkie” citation appeared in 1998 (see below).


Wikipedia: Twinkie
A Twinkie is a “Golden Sponge Cake with Creamy Filling” popular in North America. It is distributed by Continental Baking Co., which is owned by Kansas City-based Interstate Bakeries Corporation.

Twinkie production
The Twinkie was invented on April 6, 1930 by bakery manager James Dewar, making thrifty use of pans that were used for shortcake production only during the strawberry season. Twinkies originally contained a banana cream filling, but this was replaced with a vanilla cream filling during a banana shortage during World War II. The original flavor would be revisited more than half a century later as an alternative flavor.
(...)
Fried twinkies
Main article: Deep fried Twinkie
According to the Hostess website, Christopher Sell invented the “fried Twinkie” at the Chip Shop, his restaurant in Brooklyn, New York. It was described by the New York Times in this way: “Something magical occurs when the pastry hits the hot oil. The creamy white vegetable shortening filling liquefies, impregnating the sponge cake with its luscious vanilla flavor. . . The cake itself softens and warms, nearly melting, contrasting with the crisp, deep-fried crust in a buttery and suave way. The shop adds its own ruby-hued berry sauce, which provides a bit of tart sophistication.”

By 2000, the Arkansas State Fair had introduced the deep-fried Twinkie to great popular acclaim, and the notion spread to other state fairs across the U.S., as well as some establishments that specialize in fried delicacies. Fried Twinkies are sold throughout the U.S. in state fairs, as well as ball park games.

Wikipedia: Deep-fried Twinkie
A deep fried Twinkie takes the popular Hostess Twinkie cake, freezes it, dips it into batter and deep frying it to create a variation on the traditional snack cake. According to the Hostess website, Christopher Sell invented the “fried twinkie” at the ChipShop, his restaurant in Brooklyn, New York. According to CNN, the dish was adopted by Chris Mullen, but invented at a “Brooklyn restaurant.” The deep-fried Twinkie was a runaway success after Mullen and his brother started selling it at county fairs in mid-August. “We sold 26,000 Twinkies in 18 days,” By 2002, the Arkansas State Fair had introduced the fried Twinkie to great popular acclaim, and the notion spread to other state fairs across the U.S., as well as some establishments that specialize in fried foods.

Preparation
Although variations exist in the form, the deep fried Twinkie is usually prepared with a fish batter, typically consisting of flour, egg and vinegar. Prior to dipping, a wooden or plastic stick is often inserted through one end (to allow the consumer to hold it), and the Twinkie is then frozen overnight to prevent melting while being deep fried. After coating, conventional cooking oil is typically used, although beef suet or tallow is sometimes used to give a “meaty” flavor.

When prepared formally, the deep fried Twinkie is usually topped with powdered sugar and accompanied by a fruit dipping sauce. Raspberry sauce is the most frequently utilized in recipes, although some restaurants may use chocolate or caramel sauce. A scoop of vanilla ice cream is sometimes added.

It was described by a The New York Times story in this way: “Something magical occurs when the pastry hits the hot oil. The creamy white vegetable shortening filling liquefies, impregnating the sponge cake with its luscious vanilla flavor. . . The cake itself softens and warms, nearly melting, contrasting with the crisp, deep-fried crust in a buttery and suave way. The piece de resistance, however, is a ruby-hued berry sauce, adding a tart sophistication to all that airy sugary goodness.”

The Deep-fried Twinkie is served at the Little League World Series, a tradition that started in 2006.

21 September 1998, St. Paul (MN) Pioneer Press, “The Skinny” by Tim Nelson, pg. 1B:
OK, you’ve invented new State Fair food (deep-fried Twinkies), and pitched new Spice Girls (Madeleine Albright as “Allspice’’ was our winner).

New York (NY) Times
Fry That Twinkie, but Hold the Chips
By MELISSA CLARK
Published: May 15, 2002
WHAT do you do if you are young, bored and working the deep-fryer in a fish and chips shop? Fry everything you can get your hands on, of course.

In Britain, where this curious culinary tradition was born, this usually means favorites likes Mars bars, frozen pizza and even haggis.

But if your fish and chips shop is in Brooklyn, and the bodega down the block has a surplus of Twinkies, well, what experimental soul could resist? Such is the origin of the deep-fried Twinkie, a new specialty of the Chip Shop, a 14-month-old restaurant in Park Slope.

Something magical occurs when the pastry hits the hot oil. The creamy white vegetable shortening filling liquefies, impregnating the sponge cake with its luscious vanilla flavor (sure, it’s imitation, but nevertheless potent). The cake itself softens and warms, nearly melting, contrasting with the crisp, deep-fried crust in a buttery and suave way. The shop adds its own ruby-hued berry sauce, which provides a bit of tart sophistication.

Christopher Sell, 36, the shop’s owner, looks the part of an experienced fish and chips man, with his mod hair style and Union-Jack-in-a-heart T-shirt. Originally from Rugby, England, he spent his teenage years working at the shop across the street from his home. Inventing different deep-fried goodies was simply a rite of passage.
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Deep-fried Twinkies are $3 each at the Chip Shop, 383 Fifth Avenue (between 6th and 7th Streets), Park Slope, Brooklyn: (718) 832-7701.

CNN.com
New junk food fad: Deep-fried Twinkies
Wednesday, September 18, 2002 Posted: 5:42 PM EDT (2142 GMT)
PUYALLUP, Washington (Reuters)—Ever tasted a deep-fried Twinkie?
You can, if vendor Clint Mullen brings his high-calorie rendition of the notorious snack cake to a fairground near you.

First invented in a Brooklyn restaurant, the deep-fried Twinkie has become a runaway success for Mullen and his brother, Rocky Mullen, since they started selling it at country fairs in mid-August. “We sold 26,000 Twinkies in 18 days,” said Rocky, who used to run a mechanical rodeo bull rental business. “People drove for hours just to taste our Twinkie.”

Preparing the new snack is quite simple. After removing the Twinkies from their plastic wrappers, they are chilled so they don’t disintegrate when heated. Next, they are rolled in flour, dipped in a tempura batter and fried at 380 degrees Fahrenheit for 90 to 120 seconds. The cooking process melts the vanilla-cream center, which infuses the yellow cake and gives it a souffle or pudding-like texture. Finally, the treats are sprinkled with powdered sugar and served with either chocolate or berry sauce. The snack costs $3.
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Earlier this year, Hostess put Clint Mullen in touch with British chef Christopher Sell, who invented the deep-fried confection at his fish-and-chips restaurant in Brooklyn. After a few tips, the Mullens started selling the deep-fried Twinkies this summer. Soon, business was so brisk they had to call in nearly a dozen family members to help with the unwrapping and frying.

CBS News
Fried Twinkies A Heart-Stopping Hit
Calorie-Laden Dessert Proves Popular

LITTLE ROCK, Ark., Oct. 15, 2002
(AP) In the South, where some joke that the four basic food groups are barbecued, baked, broiled or fried, state fairs are filled with booths that sell everything from corn on a stick to club-like turkey legs.

For dessert, an odd new treat has emerged: fried Twinkies.

Phil Dickson, of Hot Springs, has sold about 1,000 of the batter-dipped, deep-fried goodies topped with powdered sugar since the Arkansas State Fair opened Friday.
(...)
Fairs in Arizona, California, Kansas and Washington also are expected to roll out fried Twinkies this year.

Suzanne Hackett, the general manager of an English restaurant in New York City called The ChipShop, said the fried Twinkie was born in her eatery out of boredom.

“We had a very slow night in the restaurant so we decided to buy a bunch of junk food and deep fry it,” Hackett said. “And the Twinkies just tasted so good.”

St. Petersburg (FL) Times
Curl up with local books
There are authors among us who are turning out some pretty readable - and many times hilarious - literary works.

By SHERRI DAY, RICK GERSHMAN, AMY SCHERZER, ElISABETH DYER, MEAGHAN FORBES and SUSAN THURSTON
Published December 9, 2005
(...)
The North Beach Diet: Add Belly and Hip Fat Instantly with Batter-Fried Twinkies & More... by Kim Bailey
Name a fad diet and Kim Bailey has likely tried it and failed. His new book turns the tables on his own struggles and pokes fun at America’s obsession with weight loss.

Bailey’s The North Beach Diet: Add Belly and Hip Fat Instantly with Batter-Fried Twinkies & More... parodies weight-loss books and tells readers how to bulk up.
(...)
Desserts are the author’s favorite. He includes recipes for standards such as lemon meringue pie, brownies and carrot cake. He also tosses in a few creative extras, including batter-fried Twinkies, beer-battered deep-fried Snickers and Wendy’s Chocolate Frosty Smash, a combination of Oreos, Nutter Butter cookies, ice cream and whipped cream. 

Google Books
The Twinkies Cookbook:
An Inventive and Unexpected Recipe Collection

By Leo (PHT) Gong
Berkeley, CA: Ten Speed Press
2006
Pg. 22:
DEEP-FRIED TWINKIES WITH RASPBERRY SYRUP
Make sure to serve the Twinkies warm. They’re incredibly rich, so enjoy them sparingly.

Posted by Barry Popik
New York CityFood/Drink • (5) Comments • Sunday, November 02, 2008 • Permalink


This is my families FAV. One year I actually made 10 of them, freezing each and stacking them in my freezer - then took them to Kentucky for a Family Reunion. One switch I made was making a few as “HoHo” cakes just using Chocolate Cake & pudding instead of Yellow/vanilla.
Also - When the kids were in school I would make this and cut into actual twinkie size wrap and freeze to put in their lunches. By the time lunch time came around it was thawed and ready to eat.

Posted by Tubes Fan  on  01/27  at  03:54 AM

It sounds to me like you need to be careful about eating these things. There was a rumor that Twinkies could last for 30 years.  I guess this is not the case.  It still does not seem that these are good for your health.

Posted by International Travel Insurance  on  02/15  at  08:31 PM

When the kids were in school I would make this and cut into actual twinkie size wrap and freeze to put in their lunches. By the time lunch time came around it was thawed and ready to eat.

Posted by HGH  on  11/04  at  03:08 AM

Can you say heart-attack waiting to happen?  deep fried twinkies sound ever so tasty, but i suspect they are ever-so bad for you too!

Posted by Michelle  on  11/10  at  09:12 AM

Oh my lord, deep fried twinkie? They have deep-fried Mars bars and pizzas in Scotland, I thought that was bad enough!!!

Posted by Personal Trainer Maidenhead  on  01/06  at  05:19 AM

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