A plaque remaining from the Big Apple Night Club at West 135th Street and Seventh Avenue in Harlem.

Above, a 1934 plaque from the Big Apple Night Club at West 135th Street and Seventh Avenue in Harlem. Discarded as trash in 2006.

Recent entries:
“When life hands me lemons, I make chocolate cake and leave bitches wondering” (1/19)
“Believe in yourself! If cauliflower can become pizza, you can do anything” (1/19)
“If cauliflower can somehow become pizza…then you, my friend, can do anything” (1/19)
“Are we having some drinks, or are we having some dranks? I need to dress accordingly” (1/19)
“Cyber Monday—The one time a year that people look forward to Monday mornings” (1/19)
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Entry from October 12, 2019
Gloomy Gus

Entry in progress—B.P.

Wiktionary: gloomy Gus
Noun
gloomy Gus
(plural gloomy Guses)
1. (informal) A person with a sullen, unhappy appearance or demeanor; a person with a pessimistic outlook.

Wikipedia: Happy Hooligan
Happy Hooligan was a popular and influential early American comic strip, the first major strip by the already celebrated cartoonist Frederick Burr Opper. It debuted with a Sunday strip on March 11, 1900 in the William Randolph Hearst newspapers, and was one of the first popular comics with King Features Syndicate. The strip ran for three decades, ending on August 14, 1932.

Newspapers.com
20 April 1902, San Francisco (CA) Examiner, comic supplement, pg. 1:
Happy Hooligan Discovers His Long-Lost Brother, Gloomy Gus.

Posted by Barry Popik
New York CityWorkers/People • Saturday, October 12, 2019 • Permalink