A plaque remaining from the Big Apple Night Club at West 135th Street and Seventh Avenue in Harlem.

Above, a 1934 plaque from the Big Apple Night Club at West 135th Street and Seventh Avenue in Harlem. Discarded as trash in 2006.

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Entry from May 27, 2018
Hoboweryite (hobo + Boweryite)

The Bowery (both the name of a street and a neighborhood) in Manhattan was a depressed area for much of the 1900s. Syndicated newspaper columnist Walter Winchell (1897-1972) called the place “Hobowery” (hobo + Bowery) and its residents “Hoboweryites” (hobo + Boweryite).  Winchell wrote in a column on March 27, 1942:

“As the minutes tick-tock their way toward noon, Hoboweryites resume their endless strolls to nowhere or stand around discussing nothing.”

Winchell wrote in a column on October 10, 1944:

“The gloomy Hobowery. At one time this street of sadness was the center of the town’s theatrical life.”

Winchell’s last reference was in a column on December 4, 1958:

“The Hobowery—where you can see the many faces of Hell.”

The “Hobowery” term was little-used and is of historical interest today.


Wikipedia: Bowery
The Bowery (/ˈbaʊ.əri/) is a street and neighborhood in the southern portion of the New York City borough of Manhattan. The street runs from Chatham Square at Park Row, Worth Street, and Mott Street in the south to Cooper Square at 4th Street in the north, while the neighborhood’s boundaries are roughly East 4th Street and the East Village to the north; Canal Street and Chinatown to the south; Allen Street and the Lower East Side to the east; and Little Italy to the west.
(...)
Pressure for a new name after World War I came to naught and in the 1920s and 1930s, it was an impoverished area. From the 1940s through the 1970s, the Bowery was New York City’s “Skid Row,” notable for “Bowery Bums” (disaffiliated alcoholics and homeless persons).

27 March 1942, Muncie (IN) Evening Press, “On Broadway” by Walter Winchell, pg. 5, col. 1:
New York Around The Clock.
(...)
As the minutes tick-tock their way toward noon, Hoboweryites resume their endless strolls to nowhere or stand around discussing nothing.

31 March 1944, Greensboro (NC) Record, “Broadway, New York” by Walter Winchell, pg. 6, col. 4:
SPRINGTIME IN NEW YORK
(...) (Col. 5.—ed.)
Hoboweryites oblivious to the delights of Spring, surrounded by the tombs of their own failures.

10 October 1944, Times-Leader, The Evening News (Wilkes-Barre, PA), “On Broadway” by Walter Winchell, pg. 18, col. 5:
The gloomy Hobowery. At one time this street of sadness was the center of the town’s theatrical life.

8 January 1947, The Evening News (Harrisburg, PA), “Cavalcade” by Louis Sobol (King Features Syndicate, Inc.), pg. 14, col. 7:
Has anyone, gently inquires Eli Lloyd Hoffman, referred to it as the Hobowery?

4 December 1958, Lebanon (PA) Daily News, “On Broadway” by Walter Winchell, pg. 43, col. 6:
BIG CITY PANORAMA
(...)
The Hobowery—where you can see the many faces of Hell.

Posted by Barry Popik
New York CityWorkers/People • Sunday, May 27, 2018 • Permalink