A plaque remaining from the Big Apple Night Club at West 135th Street and Seventh Avenue in Harlem.

Above, a 1934 plaque from the Big Apple Night Club at West 135th Street and Seventh Avenue in Harlem. Discarded as trash in 2006.

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Texalina (Texas + Carolina) barbecue (3/19)
Slutgers (Rutgers University nickname) (3/19)
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Entry from February 04, 2018
“I watched a film where a guy poured meat juices over a nonfiction book. It’s baste on a true story”

Many dramatic works are “based on a true story.” If that story involves food, maybe it’s “baste on a true story”? The pun was printed in the book Ridiculous Riddles (2003) by Chris Tait:

Q: What did the chef say about his first book?
A: “Baste on a true story!”


“If you’re opening a movie on Thanksgiving day, it better be baste on a true story” was posted on Twitter on November 23, 2009. “I just saw a movie about a guy who raises and cooks his own turkeys. It was baste on a true story” was posted on Twitter on July 9, 2011.

“So I’m writing a film about the time I poured meat juices over a non-fiction book. That’s right - it’s BASTE ON A TRUE STORY” was posted on Twitter by Richard on May 23, 2011.


Wikipedia: Basting (cooking)
Basting is a cooking technique that involves cooking meat with either its own juices or some type of preparation such as a sauce or marinade. The meat is left to cook, then periodically coated with the juice.

Prominently used in grilling, rotisserie, roasting, and other meat preparations where the meat is over heat for extended periods of time, basting is used to keep meat moist during the cooking process and also to apply or enhance flavor. Improperly administered basting, however, may actually lead to the very problem it is designed to prevent: the undesired loss of moisture (drying out) of the meat.

Google Books
Ridiculous Riddles
By Chris Tait
New York, NY: Sterling Publishing Company, Inc.
2003
Pg. 87:
What did the chef say about his first book?
“Baste on a true story!”

15 January 2006, Washington (DC) Post, “Week 645: A Hearty Har Har,” pg. D2:
Cooking institute and journalism school: Baste On! A True Story (Jane Auerbach, Los Angeles)

Twitter
Clayton Hove‏
@adtothebone
If you’re opening a movie on Thanksgiving day, it better be baste on a true story.
11:50 PM - 23 Nov 2009

Twitter
Richard 🌈‏
@_L_M_C_
So I’m writing a film about the time I poured meat juices over a non-fiction book. That’s right - it’s BASTE ON A TRUE STORY.
10:11 AM - 23 May 2011

Twitter
Rico Suave‏
@RappaRick
I just saw a movie about a guy who raises and cooks his own turkeys. It was baste on a true story.
5:52 PM - 9 Jul 2011

Twitter
Richard 🌈‏
@_L_M_C_
So I’m writing a film about the time I poured meat juices over a non-fiction book. That’s right - it’s BASTE ON A TRUE STORY.
3:22 AM - 21 Jul 2011

Twitter
Mark Young‏
@Mark0Young
Any of you watching that film about turkeys? It’s baste on a true story.
11:27 AM - 25 Dec 2012

Reddit—Jokes
A chef wrote his autobiography
submitted June 14, 2016 by Ahernia
While packing up the manuscript to send to the publisher, he spilled some juice from one of his roasts on it.
He said it was baste on a true story.

Twitter
Zlati Meyer‏
@Zlatimeyer
Every movie that’s “baste” on a true story. #AddATurkeyToAFilm
12:51 PM - 17 Nov 2017

Twitter
🤣 The Dad Joke Man 😉‏
@DadJokeMan
I watched a film where a guy poured meat juices over a non fiction book....
It’s baste on a true story....
3:36 PM - 3 Feb 2018

Posted by Barry Popik
New York CityFood/Drink • Sunday, February 04, 2018 • Permalink