A plaque remaining from the Big Apple Night Club at West 135th Street and Seventh Avenue in Harlem.

Above, a 1934 plaque from the Big Apple Night Club at West 135th Street and Seventh Avenue in Harlem. Discarded as trash in 2006.

Recent entries:
Entry forthcoming (12/7)
Entry forthcoming (12/7)
Entry forthcoming (12/7)
Entry forthcoming (12/7)
Entry forthcoming (12/7)
More new entries...

A  B  C  D  E  F  G  H  I  J  K  L  M  N  O  P  Q  R  S  T  U  V  W  X  Y  Z


Entry from April 26, 2019
“If experience was so important, we’d never have had anyone walk on the moon”

"If experience was so important, we’d never have had anyone walk on the moon” is a saying that has been printed on many images. Doug Rader, a manager for the San Diego Padres Class AAA team in Hawaii, was passed over for the 1982 San Diego Padres manager position in favor of Dick Williams, who had more experience.  Rader aid in November 1981:

“I don’t put a whole lot of credence in that experience thing. The Pilgrims didn’t have any experience when they first arrived here. Hell, if experience was that important, we’d have never had anybody walking on the moon. You’re either able to do something, or you’re not.”

“If experience was so important, we’d never have had anyone walk on the moon” is a popular paraphrase of Rader’s remark.


Wikipedia: Doug Rader
Douglas Lee Rader (born July 30, 1944), nicknamed “The Red Rooster”, is a former third baseman in Major League Baseball who was known primarily for his defensive ability, winning five straight Gold Glove Awards from 1970 to 1974.

Rader’s career lasted from 1967 to 1977, playing for the Houston Astros, San Diego Padres, and Toronto Blue Jays, then later managed the Texas Rangers, Chicago White Sox, and California Angels between 1983 and 1991.

20 November 1981, Asbury (NJ) Park Press, “Sports in Brief,” pg. C4, cols. 1-2:
DOUG RADER, a top candidate for the San Diego Padres’ managerial post that was filled by Dick Williams this week, says he’s “not bitter” but will re-evaluate his future with the National League club.

Rader, manager of the Padres’ Class AAA team at Hawaii for the past two years, said he was “very disappointed” when he didn’t get the big league job, apparently because of his inexperience.

Padres’ President Ballard Smith said Williams’ experience—two world championships and three American League pennants—was the deciding factor.

“I don’t put a whole lot of credence in that experience thing,” Rader, 37, who spent 10 years as a major league infielder and one year as a coach with the Padres.

“The Pilgrims didn’t have any experience when they first arrived here. Hell, if experience was that important, we’d have never had anybody walking on the moon. You’re either able to do something, or you’re not,” said Rader, who was reportedly a candidate for the Toronto job filled by Bobby Cox.

24 November 1981, Los Angeles (CA) Times, pt. 3, pg. 2, col. 1:
Morning Briefing
Some Can, Some Can’t;
Hawaii Skipper Doug Rader Is Convinced That He Can

Doug Rader, manager of San Diego’s Class AAA team in Hawaii, was not pleased when he was passed over in favor of Dick Williams as Padres manager. Especially when he heard Padres President Ballard Smith’s reason: ‘Inexperience.”

“I don’t put a whole lot of credence in that experience thing,” said Raider, 37. The Pilgrim’s didn’t have any experience when they first arrived here. Hell, if experience was that important, we’d have never had anybody walking on the moon. You’re either able to do something, or you’re not.”

27 December 1981, The News Tribune (Tacoma, WA), “Coach’s Corner” by George Raveling, pg. B-6, col. 1:
When the San Diego Padres passed over Hawaii Islanders boss Doug Rader for the club’s managerial vacancy because he lacked experience, Rader angrily responded, “The pilgrims didn’t have any experience. If experience was that important, we’d have never had anybody walking on the moon. You’re either able to do something or you’re not.”

7 March 1983, The Record (Hackensack, NJ), “Recycled managers are a fact of life” by Jack O’Connell, pg. S-12:
“Experience, experience, that’s all I kept hearing,” Rader said. “I think too much is made of this experience business. I mean if it [experience] was so important, we’d have never landed on the Moon. Tell me, who had ever bee nthere before?”

23 June 1985, Chicago (IL) Tribune, “Left out as players, they manage to win” by Michael O’Donnell, pg. 4:
The conclusion would seem to be in agreement with that of Doug Rader, fired as manager of the Texas Rangers this season: “Hell, if experience was that important, we’d never have had anybody walking on the moon.”

Google Books
--’til the Fat Lady Sings:
Classic Texas Sports Quotes

By Alan Burton
Lubbock, TX: Texas Tech University Press
1994
Pg. 102:
“The pilgrims didn’t have any experience when they first arrived here. Hell, if experience was that important, we’d never have had anybody walking on the moon.”
Former Houston Astros third baseman Doug Rader, on wanting to break into managing
Voices of Baseball: Quotations on the Summer Game

Google Groups: alt.lefthanders
notebooks
Jason Forbes
1/14/97
(...)
“If experience was everything, how did we get a man on the moon for the first time?”

Google Groups: Stolen Jokes
July 3rd Stolen Jokes
jo...@stolen-jokes.com
7/3/08
(...)
If experience was so important, we’d never have had anyone walk on the moon.

Twitter
ʍìӀɑղɑ
@rM1L
#QUOTE : If experience was so important, we’d never have had anyone walk on the moon. ~ Doug Rader
10:31 AM - 11 Mar 2009

Twitter
Sanford News
@SanfordNews_
If experience was so important, we’d never have had anyone walk on the moon.  -Doug Rader
8:59 AM - 21 Apr 2019

The Telegram (St. John’s, Newfoundland)
ROBIN SHORT: This Growler took the ball and ran with it
Robin Short ()
Published: April 26, 2019
(...)
There’s an old saying that if experience was so important, there’d be nobody on the moon.

Posted by Barry Popik
New York CityWork/Businesses • Friday, April 26, 2019 • Permalink