A plaque remaining from the Big Apple Night Club at West 135th Street and Seventh Avenue in Harlem.

Above, a 1934 plaque from the Big Apple Night Club at West 135th Street and Seventh Avenue in Harlem. Discarded as trash in 2006.

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Entry from November 20, 2017
“If you’re here for the yodeling lesson, please form an orderly orderly orderly orderly queue”

A joke about yodeling was posted on Twitter by MꙬse Allain‏ on April 18, 2016:

“If you’re here for the yodelling lesson, please form an orderly queue (orderly orderly orderly queue).”

“If you’re here for the yodelling lesson, please form an orderly orderly orderly orderly queue” was posted on Sickipedia and Twitter on April 18, 2017.


Wikipedia: Yodeling
Yodeling (also yodelling or jodeling) is a form of singing which involves repeated and rapid changes of pitch between the low-pitch chest register (or “chest voice") and the high-pitch head register or falsetto. The English word yodel is derived from the German (and originally Austro-Bavarian) word jodeln, meaning “to utter the syllable jo“ (pronounced “yo” in English). This vocal technique is used in many cultures worldwide.
(...)
Technique
Human voices have at least two distinct vocal registers, called the “head” and “chest” voices. Most people can sing tones within a certain range of lower pitches in their chest voice and tones within a certain range of higher pitch in their head voice. Falsetto is an “unsupported” register forcing vocal cords in a higher pitch without any head or chest voice air support. The range of overlap between registers, called the passaggio, can be challenging for untrained singers. Experienced singers can control their voices in this range, easily switching between registers. Yodeling is a version of this technique in which a singer might change register several times in only a few seconds and at a high volume. Repeated alternation between registers at a singer’s passaggio pitch range produces a very distinctive sound. For example, in the famous “Yodel – Ay – EEE – Oooo”, the “EEE” is sung in the head voice while all other syllables are in the chest voice.

Bart Plantenga, author of Yodel-Ay-Ee-Oooo: The Secret History of Yodeling Around the World, explains the technique:

“The basic yodel requires sudden alterations of vocal register from a low-pitched chest voice to high falsetto tones sung on vowel sounds: AH, OH, OO for chest notes and AY or EE for the falsetto. Consonants are used as levers to launch the dramatic leap from low to high, giving it its unique ear-penetrating and distance-spanning power.”

Twitter
MꙬse Allain‏
@MooseAllain
If you’re here for the yodelling lesson, please form an orderly queue (orderly orderly orderly queue).
7:35 AM - 18 Apr 2016

Sickipedia
If you’re here for the yodelling lesson, please form an orderly orderly orderly orderly queue.
Joke Submited by BigZav in Other - Random
18 April 2017 02:58 PM

Twitter
Alan Oliver‏
@AlanOliver6
If you’re here for the yodelling lesson, please form an orderly orderly orderly orderly queue.
3:22 AM - 18 Apr 2017

Twitter
ᴄᴏʟɪɴ ᴇɴɢʟɪꜱʜ‏
@ColinJEnglish
Sign seen outside a community hall:
“If you are here for the yodelling lesson, please form an orderly, orderly, orderly, orderly queue.”
5:43 AM - 18 Apr 2017

Twitter
Jokes & Memes & Shit‏
@ShittierJokes
If you’re here for the Yodelling class please form an orderly orderly orderly queue.
1:13 AM - 19 Apr 2017

Twitter
Shit Jokes‏
@ShitJokes
If you’re here for the yodeling lesson, please form an orderly orderly orderly orderly queue.
12:55 PM - 20 Jun 2017

9 July 2017, Daily Star Sunday (London, UK), pg. 25:
D OSBORNE via email
IF you’re here for the yodelling lesson, would you please form an orderly orderly orderly queue.

Posted by Barry Popik
New York CityMusic/Dance/Theatre/Film • Monday, November 20, 2017 • Permalink