A plaque remaining from the Big Apple Night Club at West 135th Street and Seventh Avenue in Harlem.

Above, a 1934 plaque from the Big Apple Night Club at West 135th Street and Seventh Avenue in Harlem. Discarded as trash in 2006.

Recent entries:
“You can’t ride two horses with one behind” (3/21)
“There are over 7,500 different types of apple, but only one ‘apple juice‘“ (3/20)
“Alcohol you later” (3/20)
“Our town is so small we don’t have a town drunk, so we all take turns” (3/20)
“If you pay for service by the hour, you buy hours and not service” (3/20)
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Entry from December 20, 2017
“I’ve trained my dog to bring me a glass of red wine. He’s a Bordeaux collie”

Is a “Bordeaux collie” (Bordeaux wine + Border Collie) a dog that will bring red wine? “Bordeaux collie” has been cited in print since at least 1995 and has been printed on several images.

“I’ve trained our dog to fetch me a glass of claret. It’s a Bordeaux collie” was posted on Twitter by Robin Flavell on February 23, 2011. “I’ve trained the dog to bring me a glass of red wine. It’s a Bordeaux collie”—slightly different—was posted on Twitter by Robin Flavell on April 2, 2011.


Wikipedia: Bordeaux wine
A Bordeaux wine is any wine produced in the Bordeaux region of southwest France, centered on the city of Bordeaux and covering the whole area of the Gironde department, with a total vineyard area of over 120,000 hectares, making it the largest wine growing area in France. Average vintages produce over 700 million bottles of Bordeaux wine, ranging from large quantities of everyday table wine, to some of the most expensive and prestigious wines in the world. The vast majority of wine produced in Bordeaux is red (called “claret” in Britain), with sweet white wines (most notably Sauternes), dry whites, and (in much smaller quantities) rosé and sparkling wines (Crémant de Bordeaux) collectively making up the remainder. Bordeaux wine is made by more than 8,500 producers or châteaux. There are 54 appellations of Bordeaux wine.

Wikipedia: Border Collie
The Border Collie is a working and herding dog breed developed in the Anglo-Scottish border region for herding livestock, especially sheep. It was specifically bred for intelligence and obedience.

Considered highly intelligent, extremely energetic, acrobatic and athletic, they frequently compete with great success in sheepdog trials and dog sports. They are often cited as the most intelligent of all domestic dogs. Border Collies continue to be employed in their traditional work of herding livestock throughout the world.

21 September 1995, The Northern Herald (Sydney, Australia), pg. 15, col. 2 illustration: 
“Agh! The dog knocked over a $150 bottle of wine!”
Bordeaux collie

Twitter
Robin Flavell‏
@RobinFlavell
I’ve trained our dog to fetch me a glass of claret. It’s a Bordeaux collie.
6:25 AM - 23 Feb 2011

Twitter
OUTVEX‏
@outvex
Humor. Much needed. RT @Uphallman: RT @jacques_aih: I’ve trained our dog to fetch me a glass of claret. It’s a Bordeaux collie.
7:00 AM - 23 Feb 2011

Twitter
Robin Flavell‏
@RobinFlavell
I’ve trained the dog to bring me a glass of red wine. It’s a Bordeaux collie.
12:24 PM - 2 Apr 2011

Google Books
Jokes for Blokes:
The Ultimate Book of Jokes not Suitable for Mixed Company

By Llewellyn Dowd and Phil McCracken
London, UK: Ebury Press
2011
Pg. 162:
What type of dog will bring you wine? A Bordeaux collie.

14 May 2011, The Daily Mirror (London, UK), “Macca Acca: Result!” by Derek McGovern and John Shaw, pg. 68:
I’VE trained my dog to bring me a glass of red wine. It’s a Bordeaux collie

Google Books
The Mammoth Book of One-Liners
Edited by Geoff Tibballs
London, UK: Constable & Robinson Ltd
2012
Pg. ?:
I’ve trained my dog to bring me a glass of red wine. He’s a Bordeaux collie.

Twitter
Dad Jokes‏
@GoodOldDadJokes
I’ve trained my dog to bring me a glass of red wine…
He’s a Bordeaux collie.
#NationalWineDay
5:35 PM - 25 May 2017

Posted by Barry Popik
New York CityFood/Drink • Wednesday, December 20, 2017 • Permalink