A plaque remaining from the Big Apple Night Club at West 135th Street and Seventh Avenue in Harlem.

Above, a 1934 plaque from the Big Apple Night Club at West 135th Street and Seventh Avenue in Harlem. Discarded as trash in 2006.

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Entry from February 02, 2018
“James Joyce walks into a bar…” (bar joke)

“A guy walks into a bar...” is a typical form of what has been called the “bar joke.” A version about Irish author James Joyce (1882-1941) is:

“James Joyce walks into a bar. ‘Why the long phrase?’ asks the barman.”

The pun is on the famous “Why the long face?” punchline of the “A horse walks into a bar...” joke. The Joyce joke was posted on Twitter on June 16, 2013.


Wikipedia: James Joyce
James Augustine Aloysius Joyce (2 February 1882 – 13 January 1941) was an Irish novelist, short story writer, and poet. He contributed to the modernist avant-garde and is regarded as one of the most influential and important authors of the 20th century. Joyce is best known for Ulysses (1922), a landmark work in which the episodes of Homer’s Odyssey are paralleled in a variety of literary styles, perhaps most prominently stream of consciousness. Other well-known works are the short-story collection Dubliners (1914), and the novels A Portrait of the Artist as a Young Man (1916) and Finnegans Wake (1939). His other writings include three books of poetry, a play, his published letters and occasional journalism.

Twitter
Jenny Colgan‏
@jennycolgan
RT @jonnygeller: James Joyce walks into a bar “Why the long phrase?” says the barman. #bloomsday
11:54 AM - 16 Jun 2013

Twitter
Overheard in Dublin‏
@OverheardDublin
James Joyce walks into a bar on #bloomsday in Dublin. “Why the long phrase?” asks the barman. (via @jonnygeller)
1:54 PM - 16 Jun 2013

Twitter
Jonny Geller‏
@JonnyGeller
#Bloomsday joke -
James Joyce walks into a bar.
“Why the long phrase?”
asks the barman.
2:14 AM - 16 Jun 2015

Facebook
Damian Barr’s Literary Salon
February 2, 2016 ·
James Joyce walks into a bar.
“Why the long phrase?” asks the barman.
Ulysses Published On This Day, 1922
Thank you Salonista Jonny Geller for sharing this.

Twitter
Overheard in Dublin‏
@OverheardDublin
James Joyce walks into a bar on Bloomsday in Dublin. “Why the long phrase?” asks the barman. #JamesJoyce
1:15 PM - 2 Feb 2016

Twitter
Jonny Geller‏
@JonnyGeller
My annual #Bloomsday joke -
James Joyce walks into a bar.
“Why the long phrase?”
asks the barman.
3:27 AM - 16 Jun 2017

Twitter
Jonny Geller‏
@JonnyGeller
James Joyce walks into a bar.
“Why the long phrase?”
asks the barman.
James Joyce, born #onthisday in 1882.
10:52 AM - 2 Feb 2018

Posted by Barry Popik
New York CityRestaurants/Bars/Coffeehouses/Food Stores • Friday, February 02, 2018 • Permalink