A plaque remaining from the Big Apple Night Club at West 135th Street and Seventh Avenue in Harlem.

Above, a 1934 plaque from the Big Apple Night Club at West 135th Street and Seventh Avenue in Harlem. Discarded as trash in 2006.

Recent entries:
“What did the big chimney say to the little chimney?"/"You’re too young to smoke.” (12/15)
“Some herbs taste much better at Christmas. It’s the most wonderful thyme of the year” (12/15)
“Are you putting the Christmas tree up yourself?"/"No, I’m going to put it up in the living room!” (12/15)
“Am I going to put the Christmas tree up myself? No, I’m going to put it up in the living room!” (12/15)
“A fireman runs into a school clutching a screwdriver and shouts, ‘This is not a drill!‘“ (12/15)
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Entry from August 08, 2004
Loisaida
"Loisaida" is Spanish for "Lower East Side." Some claim that "Lower East Side" is below Houston Street, and "Loisaida" is above Houston Street. Puerto Rican immigrants came to the area in the 1960s and 1970s, and the Spanish name was applied.

Bittman John "Bimbo" Rivas (1939-1992) wrote the poem "Loisaida" in 1974. In 1992, Avenue C was re-named "Loisaida Avenue."



7 January 1977, New York Times/i>, pg. 25:
The Magi, or Three Wise Men, visited a Puerto Rican community on the Lower East Side yesterday afternoon.

Their parade route led them through Loisada (the neighborhood south of 14th Street, east of Avenue A) where they viewed abandoned buildings now being renovated by residents on East 11th Street.


27 May 1981, New York Times, letters, pg. C8:
Loisada, actually, is the area between 14th and Houston Streets, from Avenue A east. This sunny, flowery, Spanish-flavored name for the Lower East Side was conferred on an unpromising piece of real estate by our Puerto Rican fellow residents to cheer things up a bit. The title, pronounced lo-ee-SIDE-ah. was in use before 1977, when I moved here to start the magazine The Quality of Life in Loisada. Bimbo Rivas, poet and playwright, is credited with first applying the namke and using it in a poem.
Posted by Barry Popik
Neighborhoods • (0) Comments • Sunday, August 08, 2004 • Permalink