A plaque remaining from the Big Apple Night Club at West 135th Street and Seventh Avenue in Harlem.

Above, a 1934 plaque from the Big Apple Night Club at West 135th Street and Seventh Avenue in Harlem. Discarded as trash in 2006.

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Entry from November 07, 2019
“Money talks” (proverb)

"Money talks” is a proverb that means money has influence and power. “Man prates, but gold speaks” was printed in Piazza Universale di Proverbi Italiani: or, A Common Place of Italian Proverbs and Proverbial Phrases (1666).

The English proverb “money talks” was printed in several newspapers in the United States in 1868. “Money talks” was printed in the Chicago (IL) Tribune on March 21, 1868. “The money talks, and it always will talk” was printed in The Evening Telegraph (Philadelphia, PA) on August 25, 1868. “By a prolific diffusion of dollar, ‘money talks’ you know” was printed in the Cincinnati (OH) Daily Enquirer on December 3, 1868.

Variations on the “money talks” saying include:

. “If money talks, then mine must have a speech impediment”
. “If money talks, they why do we need bank tellers?”
. “Money doesn’t talk, it screams”
. “Money doesn’t talk, it swears”
. “Money no longer talks—it now goes without saying”
. “Money talks, bullshit walks”
. “Money talks, but credit has an echo” ("Money talks, but credit uses sign language")
. “Money talks, chocolate sings”
. “Money talks, gold screams” ("Money talks, gold shouts")
. “Money talks, nobody walks”
. “Money talks, wealth whispers”
. “Old money whispers, new money shouts”
. “That money talks, I’ll not deny, I heard it once: It said, ‘Goodbye‘“


Wiktionary: money talks
Etymology
19th century, from earlier forms such as gold speaks (1666, in full, “Man prates, but gold speaks.”), as translation from Italian by Giovanni Torriano, in Piazza Universale di Proverbi Italiani: or, A Common Place of Italian Proverbs and Proverbial Phrases, 179.
Proverb
money talks

1. It is easier to accomplish goals using money instead of just talk.
Usage notes
Here talk is used metaphorically to means “has actual effect, shows seriousness”, as in similar actions speak louder than words. Contrast with sense “empty words, without impact”, as in talk is cheap and talk the talk.

(Oxford English Dictionary)
money talks: money has greater significance than mere words; wealth brings with it power and influence.
[1681 A. Behn 2nd Pt. Rover iii. i. 43 Money speaks sense in a Language all Nations understand.]
1880 G. H. Jessop & J. B. Polk Gentleman from Nevada i. 5 I ain’t going to lay down no such hand as this—here money talks—one hundred dollars, I’ve the best hand at the table.
1905 ‘O. Henry’ in N.Y. World Mag. 12 Nov. 8/1 Money talks. But you may think that the conversation of a little old ten-dollar bill in New York would be nothing more than a whisper.

Google Books
The Oxford Dictionary of Proverbs
Sixth Edition

Edited by Jennifer Speake
Previous editions edited with J. A. Simpson
New York, NY: Oxford University Press
2015
Pg. 212:
MONEY talks
Money has influence.
1666 G. TORRIANO Italian Proverbs 179 Man prates, but gold speaks.
1681 A. BEHN Rover II. III. i. Money speaks in a Language all Nations understand.
1903 Saturday Evening Post 5 Sept. 12 When money talks it often merely remarks ‘Good by’.

Newspapers.com
21 March 1868, Chicago (IL) Tribune, pg. 4, col. 3:
Young Men’s Association.
To the Editor of The Chicago Tribune:
Now that there are two tickets in the field for officer’s of the Young Men’s Association, which will do its most toward providing a permanent endowment fund for the increase of the library? “Money talks.”
A MEMBER.

Newspapers.com
25 August 1868, The Evening Telegraph (Philadelphia, PA), “The Ring,” pg. 1, col. 3:
Then another advanced into the ring and says:—“You are all suckers and snoozeys and I am talking. My novi’s can lick any of yer. The money talks, and it always will talk; 30 to 100 on the leetle novi’s as never fit a fight.”

Newspapers.com
9 September 1868, Republican Banner (Nashville, TN), “The Campaign,” pg. 1, col. 4:
The New York correspondent of the Cincinnati Enquirer writes:
(...)
I know that this is a stiff assertion, but money talks, and the man who wants to bet otherwise, can find takers anywhere lying loose round here.

Newspapers.com
3 December 1868, Cincinnati (OH) Daily Enquirer, “The New York Municipal Contest,” pg. 2, col. 4:
By a prolific diffusion of dollar, “money talks” you know.

Google Books
Money Talks:
Some of the Things it Says when it Speaks

By D. W. McClung
Cincinnati, OH: The Robert Clarke Company
1894
Pg. 14:
Money talks in a very entertaining manner.

Google Books
A Scientific Solution of the Money Question
By Arthur Kitson
Boaston, MA: Arena Publishing Company
1895
Pg. 144:
Thus we hear daily the expressions “good money,” “bad money,” an “ honest “ and a “ dishonest “ dollar. Gold is called “cowardly,” and is said to “refuse” to circulate, and the very acme of fetichism is contained in the expression “ money talks.”

OCLC WorldCat record
If Money Talks, It Ain’t on Speaking Terms With Me.
Author: Helf, J. Fred
Publisher: Chicago : Sol Bloom Mississippi State University Libraries (electronic version) 1902
Series: Charles H. Templeton, Sr. sheet music collection.; Special Collections Department, Mississippi State University Libraries.
Edition/Format: Computer file
Summary:
Bill Johnson’s wife said, ‘’Man, since you’ve been old enough to vote, You’ve promised me a lot.
If money talks, it ain’t on speakin’ terms with me.

Wikipedia: Money Talks (1997 film)
Money Talks is a 1997 American buddy action comedy film directed by Brett Ratner and starring Chris Tucker and Charlie Sheen. It is the first of four collaborations between Brett Ratner and Chris Tucker, with the other three being the Rush Hour series.

Posted by Barry Popik
New York CityBanking/Finance/Insurance • Thursday, November 07, 2019 • Permalink