A plaque remaining from the Big Apple Night Club at West 135th Street and Seventh Avenue in Harlem.

Above, a 1934 plaque from the Big Apple Night Club at West 135th Street and Seventh Avenue in Harlem. Discarded as trash in 2006.

Recent entries:
“The only thing that travels faster than light is weekends” (3/23)
“Ate a box of Thin Mints. Didn’t get thinner. I don’t think they work” (3/23)
“Drugs End All Dreams” ("dead” backronym) (3/23)
“If you know how to cheat, start now” (3/23)
“My body, my choice” (3/23)
More new entries...

A  B  C  D  E  F  G  H  I  J  K  L  M  N  O  P  Q  R  S  T  U  V  W  X  Y  Z


Entry from January 03, 2019
Mongolian Beef

The term “Mongolian barbecue” has been cited in print since at least the 1950s and is not authentic to Mongolia. The book Culture and Customs of Mongolia (2009) by Timothy Michael May stated about Mongolian beef:

“Finally, while many Chinese restaurants may attempt to entice eaters with an exotic dish called ‘Mongolian beef,’ it has little to do with Mongolia. Certainly, while the key ingredients (beef and onions) may evoke thoughts of Mongolia, it is prepared and cooked in an East Asian style.”

The Chinese-American dish of “Mongolian beef” is sliced beef, stir-fried with vegetables and prepared with a brown sauce. “Mongolian Beef” was printed in the San Mateo (CA) Times on February 24, 1961, and in the Los Angeles (CA) Times on June 4, 1964. A recipe for Mongolian Beef was printed in the Los Angeles (CA) Times on February 2, 1967.


Wikipedia: Mongolian beef
Mongolian beef (Chinese: 蒙古牛肉; pinyin: Měnggǔ niúròu) is a dish served in Chinese-American and Chinese-Australian restaurants consisting of sliced beef, typically flank steak, and stir-fried with vegetables in a savory brown sauce, usually made with hoisin sauce, soy sauce, and chili peppers. The beef is commonly paired with scallions or mixed vegetables and is often not spicy. The dish is often served over steamed rice, or in the US, over crispy fried cellophane noodles.

Mongolian beef is among the meat dishes developed in Taiwan where Mongolian barbecue restaurants first appeared. Thus, none of the ingredients or the preparation methods are drawn from traditional Mongolian cuisine.

24 February 1961, San Mateo (CA) Times, “Everything But Walls of China,” pg. 18, col. 4:
Met personable Ethel Chang of the Moon Gate Restaurant the other p.m. Ethel, who recently took over this 2507 El Camino Real location, has prepared a very outstanding all-Chinese food menu. Such entries as Mongolian Beef, Kung Pao chicken, and sweet and sour fish are yours for the ordering.

4 June 1964, Los Angeles (CA) Times, “Round About” with Art Ryon, pg. A30, col. 3:
It is the Li-Ling restaurant at 6556 Hollywood Blvd., (between Vine St. and Highland Ave.)
(...)
But the rather extensive menu features Peking duck, Mongolian beef and Imperial chicken—diced breast of chicken with vegetables, cashew nuts, water chestnuts, and prepared with special sauces.

2 February 1967, Los Angeles (CA) Times, “4665—A Vintage Year” by Rose Dosti, pt. 5, pg. 3, col. 3:
MONGOLIAN BEEF
(Mongo Ngow)
1/2 lb. broccoli
1 lb. flank steak
1 tbsp. flour
1/4 tsp. salt
2 tbsp. peanut oil
1/4 tsp. pepper
1/4 tsp. ginger
1/4 tsp. garlic powder
1/4 cup sliced mushrooms
1 tbsp. cornstarch
1 tbsp. soy sauce
1 tomato, sliced
Cook broccoli in boiling salted water until crisp-tender and keep warm. Cut beef across the grain into thin slices. Mix flour and salt. Dredge beef sliced in seasoned flour. Heat skillet until drop of water skitters in pan and add oil. Add beef and cook 5 seconds. Add pepper, ginger, garlic powder and mushrooms and cook 5 seconds, stirring. Blend cornstarch with soy sauce until smooth and stir into beef mixture. Cook, stirring constantly, 10 seconds. Drain broccoli and arrange on heated platter. Top with beef mixture. Arrange tomato slices around dish. Serve at once. Makes 4 servings.

12 February 1967, Los Angeles (CA) Times, “Roundabout” by Lois Dwan, pg. 42, col. 3:
(Peking, 234 West Manchester, Inglewood.—ed.)
The marinated Mongolian beef is good here ...

Google Books
Cue (New York, NY)
Volume 41, Issues 40-52
1972
Pg. 44:
Try scallion lamb with a slight hint of ginger, or Mongolian beef which is toss-cooked and fork-tender.

Google Books
Dollarwise Guide to California and Las Vegas
By George McDonald
New York, NY: Frommer/Pasmantier
1983
Pg. 38:
Smoked tea duck, baked to crispness in special ovens over burning tea leaves ($14), and Mongolian beef — slices of lamb or beef grilled quickly over the fire pit, served in hot Mandarin buns ($9.25) — are specialties.

Google Books
Culture and Customs of Mongolia
By Timothy Michael May
Westport, CT: Greenwood Press
2009
Pg. 98:
Finally, while many Chinese restaurants may attempt to entice eaters with an exotic dish called “Mongolian beef,” it has little to do with Mongolia. Certainly, while the key ingredients (beef and onions) may evoke thoughts of Mongolia, it is prepared and cooked in an East Asian style. The Mongolian style would be boiled or probably cooked all together in a container.

YouTube
Mongolian Beef
Seonkyoung Longest
Published on Aug 4, 2015
This Americanized Mongolian Beef is sweet, tenter and irrecusable!! The ingredients are so simple, but the flavor is the BOMB!!

delish
Our Mongolian Beef Is Even More Addictive Than P.F. Chang’s
The sweet and sticky sauce is INSANE.

MAY 13, 2016
If you’re talking to a cult fan of P.F. Chang’s—trust me, they exist—one of their most beloved dishes will always be the Mongolian Beef. If you’re not familiar with the dish, it’s pieces of steak that are seared over high heat in a generous layer of oil so the texture gets perfectly crispy (a key characteristic) and then tossed in an insanely addictive sauce.

delish
Mongolian Beef
MAY 13, 2016
Our version puts P.F. Chang’s to shame.
INGREDIENTS
1/4 c. plus 1 tbsp. vegetable oil, divided
2 cloves garlic, minced
1 tbsp. minced fresh ginger
3/4 c. soy sauce
1/2 c. water
1/2 c. brown sugar
1 lb. flank steak, sliced against the grain
1/4 c. cornstarch
4 green onions, sliced into quarters, plus 1 chopped green onion for garnish
Butter lettuce, for serving

Twitter
Kaoru 🍜
@Kay819
@tablefortwoblog’s Mongolian Beef recipe for dinner tonight! #tft31 #tablefortwoblogrecipes
7:47 PM - 3 Jan 2019

Posted by Barry Popik
New York CityFood/Drink • Thursday, January 03, 2019 • Permalink