A plaque remaining from the Big Apple Night Club at West 135th Street and Seventh Avenue in Harlem.

Above, a 1934 plaque from the Big Apple Night Club at West 135th Street and Seventh Avenue in Harlem. Discarded as trash in 2006. Now a Popeye's fast food restaurant on Google Maps.

Recent entries:
“Do what makes you happy because if you died today, your job would be posted before your obituary” (6/13)
“Take care of you because if you died today, your job will be posted online before your obituary” (6/13)
Entry in progress—BP (6/13)
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Entry from May 10, 2021
“On top of spaghetti all covered with cheese…”

Entry in progress—BP


Wikipedia: On Top of Old Smoky
“On Top of Old Smoky” (often spelled “Smokey") is a traditional folk song of the United States. As recorded by The Weavers, the song reached the pop music charts in 1951. It is catalogued as Roud Folk Song Index No. 414.

Lyrics
About On Top of Spaghetti
“On Top of Spaghetti” is a ballad and children’s song with the best-known performance by folk singer Tom Glazer with the Do-Re-Mi Children’s Chorus in 1963. The song is sung to the tune of “On Top of Old Smoky”. It is the tale of a meatball that was lost when “somebody sneezed”. The song discusses what happened to the meatball after it fell off of a pile of spaghetti and rolled away. In 1961, to the same tune, Dick Biondi, The 9-Midnight DJ on WLS Chicago (1960–63), had recorded on IRC “The Pizza Song”. In 1962 Sharon and the Lollipops recorded “On Top of Spaghetti” with a lyric credit to Sharon Ruth. It was released in June 1962 and reviewed by Billboard in its Limited Sales Potential column in June 23 of that year. A version in Swedish was released in 1962 by Snopporna. Tom Glazer with the Do-Re-Mi Children’s Chorus, extended version was released on Kapp in 1963 with a contradictory lyric credit to Tom Glazer, but no publishing references were noted on the release labels. That version reached #14 on the Billboard Hot 100

On top of spaghetti all covered with cheese
I lost my poor meatball when somebody sneezed

It rolled off the table, it rolled on the floor
And then my poor meatball rolled out of the door

It rolled in the garden and under a bush
And then my poor meatball was nothing but mush.

The mush was as tasty as tasty could be,
And early next summer it grew to a tree.

The tree was all covered with beautiful moss
It grew great big meatballs and tomato sauce.

So if you eat spaghetti all covered with cheese,
Hold on to your meatball and don’t ever sneeze.

Newspapers.com
15 July 1960, Daily World (Opelousas, LA), pg. 4, col. 5:
Oh, Lost One
Poor Meatball

HUNTSVILLE, TEx. (UPI)—

Posted by Barry Popik
New York CityFood/Drink • Monday, May 10, 2021 • Permalink