A plaque remaining from the Big Apple Night Club at West 135th Street and Seventh Avenue in Harlem.

Above, a 1934 plaque from the Big Apple Night Club at West 135th Street and Seventh Avenue in Harlem. Discarded as trash in 2006.

Recent entries:
Entry forthcoming—B.P. (10/19)
Entry forthcoming—B.P. (10/19)
Entry forthcoming—B.P. (10/19)
Entry forthcoming—B.P. (10/19)
Entry forthcoming—B.P. (10/19)
More new entries...

A  B  C  D  E  F  G  H  I  J  K  L  M  N  O  P  Q  R  S  T  U  V  W  X  Y  Z


Entry from October 11, 2017
“‘Probiotic’ sounds a lot better than ‘bacteria infested‘“

"Probiotic” sounds like something good, but some people might not like it if it went by another name. “‘Probiotic’ sounds a lot sexier that ‘dead bacteria parts’” was printed on a 2014 blog. “Probiotic sounds so much better than paying extra for bacteria in your food” was posted on Twitter on April 13, 2015.

“‘Probiotic’ sounds a lot better than ‘bacteria infested’” was posted on Reddit—Shower Thoughts on October 11, 2017.


Wikipedia: Probiotic
Probiotics are defined as microorganisms that are believed to provide health benefits when consumed. The term probiotic is currently used to name ingested microorganisms associated with benefits for humans and animals. The term came into more common use after 1980. The introduction of the concept (but not the term) is generally attributed to Nobel laureate Élie Metchnikoff, who postulated that yogurt-consuming Bulgarian peasants lived longer lives because of this custom. He suggested in 1907 that “the dependence of the intestinal microbes on the food makes it possible to adopt measures to modify the flora in our bodies and to replace the harmful microbes by useful microbes”. A significant expansion of the potential market for probiotics has led to higher requirements for scientific substantiation of putative benefits conferred by the microorganisms.

Although there are numerous claimed benefits of using commercial probiotics, such as reducing gastrointestinal discomfort, improving immune health, relieving constipation, or avoiding the common cold, such claims are not backed by scientific evidence and are prevented as deceptive advertisements in the United States by the Federal Trade Commission.

Makeup & Beauty Blog
S. says
June 24th, 2014 at 9:58 pm
I have a hard time believing that there are *active* probiotics in a cosmentic product that has any shelf life.
(...)
“Probiotic” sounds a lot sexier that “dead bacteria parts”.

Twitter
Gisele Noel‏
@GiseleNoel
Probiotic sounds so much better than paying extra for bacteria in your food.
9:30 PM - 13 Apr 2015

Reddit—Shower Thoughts
“Probiotic” sounds a lot better than “bacteria infested”
submitted October 11, 2017 by milleria
Edit: To everyone saying it’s not really “infested:” https://i.imgur.com/gRk1uZm.gif

Twitter
ShowerThoughts Bot‏
@thoughtsbybot
“Probiotic” sounds a lot better than “bacteria infested” #showerthoughts
9:53 AM - 11 Oct 2017

Twitter
50 Shades of Sarcasm‏
@50Sarcasm
“Probiotic” sounds a lot better than “bacteria infested”
12:03 PM - 11 Oct 2017

Twitter
Random Emo SongLyric‏
@omgloletcetc
“do you want this bacteria infested yogurt?”
EWW NO!
“what about this probiotic yogurt?”
GIMMIE!
5:42 PM - 11 Oct 2017

Twitter
Bambi Jimenez‏
@BrendaEJ04
Probiotics really does sound better than “bacteria infested”
9:04 PM - 11 Oct 2017 from Phoenix, AZ

Posted by Barry Popik
New York CityFood/Drink • Wednesday, October 11, 2017 • Permalink