A plaque remaining from the Big Apple Night Club at West 135th Street and Seventh Avenue in Harlem.

Above, a 1934 plaque from the Big Apple Night Club at West 135th Street and Seventh Avenue in Harlem. Discarded as trash in 2006. Now a Popeye's fast food restaurant on Google Maps.

Recent entries:
“If you eat today, thank a farmer. If it’s on your table, thank a trucker” (10/19)
Entry in progress—BP (10/19)
Entry in progress—BP (10/19)
“How did the zombie bodybuilder hurt his back?"/"He was dead lifting.” (10/19)
“What does a zombie bodybuilder crave?"/"GAAAAAAAIIINNNS!” (10/19)
More new entries...

A  B  C  D  E  F  G  H  I  J  K  L  M  N  O  P  Q  R  S  T  U  V  W  X  Y  Z


Entry from August 08, 2020
Rich Boy (sandwich name variant of “poor boy")

New Orleans, Louisiana, is known for its “poor boy” ("po’ boy") sandwich. However, at about the same time as the birth of the “po’ boy,” Martin J. Cull delicatessen, located in New Orleans at 3201-03 Magazine Street, served “rich boy” sandwiches.

Martin J. Cull advertised in The Times-Picayune (New Orleans, LA) on August 22, 1931, “Also Rich Boy sandwiches, 2 for 5c.” On January 14, 1933, Martin J. Cull advertised a depression special, “Rich Boy sandwiches, you get 3 for 5c, flavored with relish, etc.”

Sometimes “rich boy” just describes an overpriced “poor boy.” “THEY’RE GOING to have to change the name of the Po’ Boy sandwich to the Rich Boy sandwich at this rate. Dropping into a plush suburban restaurant for a bite to eat, we were transfixed to observe on the menu NEW ORLEANS POOR BOY SANDWICH, $1.45” was printed in The Times-Picayune on April 16, 1963.


22 August 1931, The Times-Picayune (New Orleans, LA), pg. 18, col. 4 ad:
Poppy seed bread, 5c. Also Rich Boy sandwiches, 2 for 5c.
MARTIN J. CULL
3201-03 MAGAZINE STREET

26 September 1931, The Times-Picayune (New Orleans, LA), pg. 18, col. 4 ad:
DELICATESSEN
2 rich boy sandwiches 5c, and a glass of milk equals dinner for a dime.
(...)
MARTIN J. CULL
3201-03 MAGAZINE STREET

10 October 1931, The Times-Picayune (New Orleans, LA), pg. 20, col. 3 ad:
DELICATESSEN
(...)
Rich boy sandwiches do not make your hands or clothes dirty. For a nickel you get one for “him” and one for you.
(...)
MARTIN J. CULL
3201-03 MAGAZINE STREET

24 October 1931, The Times-Picayune (New Orleans, LA), pg. 23, col. 3 ad:
DELICATESSEN
A poor boy won’t starve if he eats 2 rich boy sandwiches for 5c.
(...)
MARTIN J. CULL
3201-03 MAGAZINE STREET

14 January 1933, The Times-Picayune (New Orleans, LA), pg. 18, col. 1 ad:
Rich Boy sandwiches, you get 3 for 5c, flavored with relish, etc.
(...)
MARTIN J. CULL
3201-03 MAGAZINE STREET

21 January 1933, The Times-Picayune (New Orleans, LA), pg. 16, col. 5 ad:
You can eat a sandwich in any kind of “languidge.” “3 rich boys 5c.”
MARTIN J. CULL
3201-03 MAGAZINE STREET

Newspapers.com
6 November 1956, Register-Star-News (Sandusky, OH), pg. 7, col. 3:
Damage Suit
Over Sandwich

COLUMBUS, Nov, 6 (UP)—Jimmy Corrova, who sells his patented “Poor Boy” sandwiches here, today sued a competitor for advertising “A Rich Poor sandwich at Poor Boy prices.”
(...)
Corrova added that his “Poor Boy” sells for only 50 cents, while the “Rich Boy” brings 60 cents.

24 May 1959, Council Bluffs (IA) Nonpareil, pg. 6B, col. 5 ad:
RICH BOY SANDWICH
(...)
RUDY’S DRIVE-IN

16 April 1963, The Times-Picayune (New Orleans, LA), “Remoulade: Poor Boy Sandwich Goes High Falutin’” by Howard Jacobs, sec, 1, pg. 9, col. 1:
THEY’RE GOING to have to change the name of the Po’ Boy sandwich to the Rich Boy sandwich at this rate. Dropping into a plush suburban restaurant for a bite to eat, we were transfixed to observe on the menu NEW ORLEANS POOR BOY SANDWICH, $1.45.

Newspapers.com
22 May 1966, Los Angeles (CA) Times, “Roundabout,” Calendar sec., pg. 38, col. 4:
Rich on Poor Boys
Note to those searching for poor boy sandwiches.  Try Pupi’s Pastries, 8710 Sunset Blvd. There they call them “Rich Boy” sandwiches.

Twitter
Phil Ruppanner
@pruppanner
Ted’s sandwiches are a-callin’ and I am picking up. Hello? Ted’s Rich Boy sandwich? Yes, I would like to put you in my belly. No, thank you.
5:28 PM · Aug 26, 2008·Twitter Web Client

The Wall Street Journal
FOOD & DRINK March 5, 2011
The Crescent City’s Greatest Po’boys
Seventy-two hours of gravy-faced, napkin-thrashing, French bread-crunching taste-testing of New Orleans’ most beloved sandwich

By STEVE GARBARINO
(...)
The po’boy was named in 1929 by brothers Bennie and Clovis Martin, New Orleans bakers and former trolley conductors who fed drivers immersed in a historic streetcar strike free sandwiches filled with scraps. (These days, 6- to 8-inch-long “shorties” cost from $5 to $11, depending on fillings.) As a new worker approached the food line outside their French Market bakery and restaurant, the brothers, according to authenticated family letters, would shout to each other, “Here comes another poor boy.”
(...)
“It’s a ‘rich-boy,’ not a po’boy,” concedes Tenney Flynn, chef of the French Quarter seafood restaurant GW Fins, whose fried-Maine-lobster po’boy took “Best of Show” at last November’s festival.

Facebook
Marianne’s Kitchen
December 30, 2015 ·
Lunch specials—combo grilled chicken, tart cherry, & candied cashew salad with a cup of soup; Rich Boy sandwich; or turkey melt on cranberry walnut
Soups—creamy potato, gumbo, or chili

Twitter
Bruh.
@CheerwinePapi
This Is It! (Atlanta) is selling “Rich Boy” sandwiches, as opposed to Po Boys
4:05 PM · Mar 12, 2016·Twitter for iPhone

Facebook
Wing Taxi Wings
July 28, 2019 ·
RICH-BOY SANDWICH…

Posted by Barry Popik
Nicknames of Other PlacesBig Easy, City That Care Forgot (New Orleans nicknames) • Saturday, August 08, 2020 • Permalink