A plaque remaining from the Big Apple Night Club at West 135th Street and Seventh Avenue in Harlem.

Above, a 1934 plaque from the Big Apple Night Club at West 135th Street and Seventh Avenue in Harlem. Discarded as trash in 2006.

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“Stop posting your problems on Facebook and drink alcohol like the rest of us” (12/13)
“My life is just a series of awkward and humiliating moments separated by snacks” (12/13)
“My life is just a series of awkward moments separated by snacks” (12/13)
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Entry forthcoming (12/13)
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Entry from October 01, 2017
Rules of Eighth Avenue (in Manhattan)

There have been several “Rules of Eighth Avenue.”

The third Madison Square Garden was located on Eighth Avenue, between 49th and 50th Street in Manhattan, from 1925 to 1968. It hosted many boxing events, such as the New York Golden Gloves. Budd Schulberg (1914-2009) wrote in Sports Illustrated on November 29, 1954:

“In the upper left-hand corner is a hand, and in the lower right corner another hand, signifying that reassuring Golden Rule of Eighth Avenue: ‘Never let your right hand know what your left hand is doing and vice-a-voisa.’”

Eighth Avenue was a place of prostitution and drugs in the 1970s. James Rothstein, who served on the New York Police Department from 1965 to 1980, said in a 2013 interview:

“I look at the basics. It’s the economics of it. And there are rules. I call them the Rules of Eighth Avenue. If you violate those rules, you die. And if I’m doing an investigation, if somebody violated those rules, it’s not hard to figure out what the story is.”


Wikipedia: Eighth Avenue (Manhattan)
Eighth Avenue is a major north-south avenue on the west side of Manhattan in New York City, carrying northbound traffic below 59th Street. While the avenue has different names at different points in Manhattan, it is actually one continuous stretch of road.

Sports Illustrated
Nov. 29, 1954
A CALL TO ARMS
The founder of the Association for the Protection of the Poor Put-upon Fight Fan welcomes new members and bids them join the cry for an overdue delousing
By Budd Schulberg
(...)
The APPPFF, you may remember, stands for the Association for the Protection of the Poor Put-upon Fight Fan. The banner of this new association is a coarse, white, rubdown towel, trimmed in red, symbolizing both the gore spilled by the gladiators for our enjoyment and the trimmings they get inside the ring and out. In the center is a cross, with an extra line transecting the horizontal. Any resemblance between this and a symbol of the old double cross is exactly what our own Betsy Ross had in mind. In the upper left-hand corner is a hand, and in the lower right corner another hand, signifying that reassuring Golden Rule of Eighth Avenue: “Never let your right hand know what your left hand is doing and vice-a-voisa.”

YouTube
Mike Harris and James Rothstein - Human Compromise
Lozzies Thirdgo
Published on Sep 21, 2013
Mike Harris’ interview with James Rothstein.  James is an ex NYPD Detective who spent 35 years on the force mostly investigating human trafficking and paedophile rings.  Relates how these criminal activities have been used by organised crime to blackmail and compromise senior politicians, judges, corporate, banking and military leaders.  Mothers Rise UP! 
Edited to remove breaks and technical difficulties. 
1:07:17
JAMES ROTHSTEIN: “I look at the basics. It’s the economics of it. And there are rules. I call them the Rules of Eighth Avenue. If you violate those rules, you die. And if I’m doing an investigation, if somebody violated those rules, it’s not hard to figure out what the story is.”

YouTube
Retired NYPD Det. Jim Rothstein: Bay of Pigs, Frank Sturgis , JFK 2014 01 17
Ed Opperman
Published on Aug 9, 2015
8:15
JIM ROTHSTEIN: “There’s a rule that I knew about. It’s called the ‘Rules of Eighth Avenue.’ You don’t stiff somebody.”
40:30
JIM ROTHSTEIN: “They’re the Rules of Eighth Avenue. When you double-cross certain people you will die.”

Posted by Barry Popik
New York CityStreets • Sunday, October 01, 2017 • Permalink