A plaque remaining from the Big Apple Night Club at West 135th Street and Seventh Avenue in Harlem.

Above, a 1934 plaque from the Big Apple Night Club at West 135th Street and Seventh Avenue in Harlem. Discarded as trash in 2006. Now a Popeye's fast food restaurant on Google Maps.

Recent entries:
“Shit is fucked up and stuff” (9/22)
Entry in progress—BP (9/22)
“Food trucks should park outside every restaurant requiring vaccination cards” (9/22)
“Why did the lady wear a helmet every time she ate?"/"She was on a crash diet.” (9/22)
“Why are televisions attracted to people?"/"Because people turn them on.” (9/22)
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Entry from July 12, 2004
Sand Hog (Sandhog)
It's either "sand hog" or "sandhog." The men who built our bridges and tunnels have a name. Surpisingly, this doesn't appear in Irving Lewis Allen's City in Slang (1993).

25 July 1897, New York Times, "The New East River Bridge," pg. SM6:
These "sand hogs" or caisson men are perhaps the most unique body of laborers in the world. Working in compressed air far below the surface of land or water is a diifcult, often, indeed, a dangerous trade, and the wages are proportionately high. "Sand-hogging" is not skilled labor, but few skilled laborers and master workmen get higher pay than these men. (...)

"The Bend" is the fate that awaits nearly all of the "pressure workers" as the caisson chamber men are also called. It is known, too, as the "caisson disease," and much resembles rheumatism.

Posted by Barry Popik
Workers/People • (1) Comments • Monday, July 12, 2004 • Permalink


Use to work as a sandhog on the water tunnel in the 70’s

Posted by GARY BRIEN  on  09/11  at  06:50 PM

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