A plaque remaining from the Big Apple Night Club at West 135th Street and Seventh Avenue in Harlem.

Above, a 1934 plaque from the Big Apple Night Club at West 135th Street and Seventh Avenue in Harlem. Discarded as trash in 2006.

Recent entries:
“My goal this weekend is to move just enough so people don’t think I’m dead” (3/25)
“In what aisle could I find the Polish sausage?” (Polish joke) (3/24)
“I hate people who bang on your door and tell you to be ‘saved’ or you’ll ‘burn.’ Stupid firemen” (3/24)
“Congress is good at only two things—doing nothing and overreacting” (3/24)
“Confidence is going after Moby Dick in a rowboat and taking the tartar sauce with you” (3/24)
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Entry from March 27, 2005
Mile High City (summary)
In the second-half of the 1800s, it was determined that Denver was a "mile high." Around 1900, Denver became known as the "mile high city."


20 July 1905, Wellsboro (PA) Gazette, pg. 1, col. 2:
The reunion of the B. P. O. E. will be held in Denver in 1906. Perry Clay led the fight at Buffalo for the mile high city.


18 December 1907, Los Angeles Times, pg. II2:
DENVER PLANS DOINGS
FOR ITS COMMITTEE.

Mile-High City Will Be Turned
Inside Out in Honor of Men Who
Captured Democratic Convention.
Posted by Barry Popik
Nicknames of Other PlacesMile High City (Denver nickname) • (0) Comments • Sunday, March 27, 2005 • Permalink